Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 28th Oct 2009 23:20 UTC
Legal As most of you will know, Nokia slapped Apple with a patent lawsuit last week. Nokia claims that Apple's iPhone infringes upon 10 patents related to GSM, UMTS, and WiFi connectivity. In its SEC 10-K annual report filing, Apple made its first cautious response to Nokia's claims.
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Not about BS patents
by Verenkeitin on Thu 29th Oct 2009 05:18 UTC
Verenkeitin
Member since:
2007-07-01

"If you can't beat them, sue them"

Note that this is about actual technology patents and not about "Using fingers to touch things" patents Apple generates.

Reply Score: 10

v RE: Not about BS patents
by haus on Thu 29th Oct 2009 07:16 in reply to "Not about BS patents"
RE[2]: Not about BS patents
by SReilly on Thu 29th Oct 2009 08:34 in reply to "RE: Not about BS patents"
SReilly Member since:
2006-12-28

Apple patented specific hand gestures to use multitouch... something very reasonable in my opinion as it relates to very specific ways of interacting with a device.

I like to agree with you but I'm afraid that the following...

A computer-implemented method for use in conjunction with a computing device with a touch screen display comprises: detecting one or more finger contacts with the touch screen display, applying one or more heuristics to the one or more finger contacts to determine a command for the device, and processing the command. The one or more heuristics comprise: a heuristic for determining that the one or more finger contacts correspond to a one-dimensional vertical screen scrolling command, a heuristic for determining that the one or more finger contacts correspond to a two-dimensional screen translation command, and a heuristic for determining that the one or more finger contacts correspond to a command to transition from displaying a respective item in a set of items to displaying a next item in the set of items.

...taken from [link]http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p... || this patent[/link] does not bode well of your assertion.

Frankly, I'm all in favour of hardware patents but in this case I'll reserve judgement until I have the full story. If Nokia are talking about purely interoperability patents then I'll be siding with Apple, loathed as I am to do any such thing.

Apple was shouting about how they patented the crap out of the iPhone. I guess what goes around comes around.

Edit: Bloody OSNews none standard link! ;-p

Edited 2009-10-29 08:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Not about BS patents
by Laurence on Thu 29th Oct 2009 10:40 in reply to "RE: Not about BS patents"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Verenkeitin said, "Note that this is about actual technology patents and not about "Using fingers to touch things" patents Apple generates."

I know it's popular to imply that Apple patented multitouch which is something they can't and also shouldn't be allowed to do as they didn't create it. Thankfully for this argument, that's simply not the case anyways.

Apple patented specific hand gestures to use multitouch... something very reasonable in my opinion as it relates to very specific ways of interacting with a device. To steal it is akin to Microsoft stealing Apple's user interface concepts in '83-'84 most of which Apple either invented themselves or purchased from Xerox.

Please don't continue to muddy the understanding of this issue by reinforcing the former way of thinking.

On that note, the "actual technology" you refer to are technologies that should never have been patentable in the first place as they are what we might like to consider open technologies.... hence the reason why Apple is fighting it and if anything a clear reason why we should be siding with Apple on this issue despite your feelings about unrelated lawsuits they were involved in.

[Again] I know it's popular (if only almost exclusively on this site) to find a reason to stand against Apple whenever possible, but I would just ask that you reserve that way of thinking for issues for which the outcome might have some impact on your lives rather than it be a way to simply thumb your nose at the company you try so hard to find a reason to hate.


I see what you're saying, but if Nokia's patents are considered "open technology" then why can't any of the following Apple technologies also be classed as open tech?:

* Multi-touch gesgures when most gesgures are a pretty generic action?

* Or Apples WIMP when using icons as an application identifier is a pretty logical and a standard way of thinking?
(eg companies have "icons" (aka logos) to represent their company, buttons on old devices has "icons" (aka cymbols) to represent their functions, etc)


From where I'm sat, Apple have been very "trigger happy" with their lawyers.
Now whether you agree with Apples individual cases or not, you can't argue that it's OK for Apple to defend Apple's patents but wrong for Nokia to defend their own ones too.

Reply Parent Score: 4