Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 29th Oct 2009 15:39 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu We're a little late, but Real Life got in the way, so here we finally are. Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, announced today that Ubuntu 9.10 Desktop Edition has been released. This version focusses on improvements in cloud computing on the server using Eucalyptus, further improvements in boot speed, as well as development on Netbook Remix. The related KDE, Xfce, and other variants have been released as well. Update by ELQ: Just a quick note to say that one of my Creative Commons videos was selected to be part of Ubuntu's Free Culture Showcase package that comes by default with the new Ubuntu version!
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Buggy, buggy
by mrAmiga500 on Thu 29th Oct 2009 23:06 UTC
mrAmiga500
Member since:
2009-03-20

I just upgraded (it took 6 hours) When I rebooted and logged in I got a crash that totally reminded me of a crashed TRS-80 Colour Computer - low-res characters of random colour filled the screen. After pressing the power button to restart, it booted - this time fine, but no sound. It can't find either the built in sound or PCI sound card.

I think this thing needs more testing.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Buggy, buggy
by lemur2 on Thu 29th Oct 2009 23:58 in reply to "Buggy, buggy"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I just upgraded (it took 6 hours) When I rebooted and logged in I got a crash that totally reminded me of a crashed TRS-80 Colour Computer - low-res characters of random colour filled the screen. After pressing the power button to restart, it booted - this time fine, but no sound. It can't find either the built in sound or PCI sound card. I think this thing needs more testing.


Upgrading any OS at all rarely works well.

The recommendation for Linux distributions is to make separate partitions for / (root), /home and swap. When it comes to a new distribution to try, or an upgrade to your existing distribution, then install the new OS with re-format to the root partition (/), and use but do NOT re-format the /home partition.

Sweet. Works every time, no problems normally. Installing a Linux distribution to a freshly-formatted / partition from a LiveCD normally takes only 20 minutes or so.

If you haven't done this separate partitions arrangement, then you can still recover the situation. Using a LiveCD, save everything existing under /home to another backup disk, wipe the first disk and re-partition it to have separate /, /home and swap partitions, restore the contents of /home from the other backup disk, then re-install the new OS to /. After re-boot, re-create your users with the same usernames as before, and accept the existing home directories for them.

If the new OS doesn't work for whatever reason, then just get the previous version Live CD and revert to that. It will take another 20 minutes, but you have lost nothing but less than one hour of your time.

Edited 2009-10-30 00:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Buggy, buggy
by mrAmiga500 on Fri 30th Oct 2009 00:08 in reply to "RE: Buggy, buggy"
mrAmiga500 Member since:
2009-03-20

Upgrading any OS at all rarely works well.

The recommendation for Linux distributions is to make separate partitions for / (root), /home and swap. When it comes to a new distribution to try, or an upgrade to your existing distribution, then install the new OS with re-format to the root partition (/), and use but do NOT re-format the /home partition.

Sweet. Works every time, no problems normally. Installing a Linux distribution to a freshly-formatted / partition form a LiveCD normally takes only 20 minutes or so.

If you haven't done this separate partitions arrangement, then you can still recover the situation. Using a LiveCD, save everything existing under /home to another backup disk, wipe the first disk and re-partition it to have separate /, /home and swap partitions, restore the contents of /home from the other backup disk, then re-install the new OS to /. After re-boot, re-create your users with the same usernames as before, and accept the existing home directories for them.


Yes, but wouldn't you have to manually re-install all your software too? (stuff that wouldn't be in the home folder)... and the dependent libraries... and other miscellaneous stuff...

I did a complete wipe when I went from 8.04 to 8.10 and reinstalling and reconfiguring everything was a major pain in the ass.

That's what made me want to do an upgrade this time. Having to reinstall and reconfigure every time there's an update seems like total inefficiency to me.

Edited 2009-10-30 00:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Buggy, buggy
by moleskine on Fri 30th Oct 2009 00:08 in reply to "RE: Buggy, buggy"
moleskine Member since:
2005-11-05

Upgrading any OS at all rarely works well.

The recommendation for Linux distributions is to make separate partitions for / (root), /home and swap. When it comes to a new distribution to try, or an upgrade to your existing distribution, then install the new OS with re-format to the root partition (/), and use but do NOT re-format the /home partition.

Sweet. Works every time, no problems normally. Installing a Linux distribution to a freshly-formatted / partition form a LiveCD normally takes only 20 minutes or so.


FWIW, that has not been my experience. I've updated Debian from testing to unstable or from stable to testing numerous times with no problems. Recently, I've upgraded SuSE 11.1 to various stages of the 11.2 beta (now RC) without problems too. While I have had times when the process has foobared, this hasn't been for two or three years now and I suspect that distros have generally got better at dealing with big, system-wide upgrades.

I agree that a fresh new install may well be a better option in some circumstances, or may be unavoidable because, for example, you wish to change the filing system. But increasingly, I think it is worth having a go at upgrade in situ, although as always you need to back everything up in case it all goes wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Buggy, buggy
by Nalle on Sun 1st Nov 2009 06:50 in reply to "RE: Buggy, buggy"
Nalle Member since:
2005-07-06

This time I went even further, even though I have partitioned as you recommend here.

I usually just reinstall on my «/» partition, leving all my previous settings and then run s script I've hacked together to get things such as java, flash, dvcss2, all the codecs, fonts and a few apps I like to have (as skype & google earth...), but aren't installed by default on UNR (oh, yeah my main computer is an EEE 900). You can find the script at the following address: http://nalle.no/apps/standard-installapps-ubuntu As I said, it's just a hack, but it'll give you all the extras.

This time I did a clean install; only copying back again .mozilla, .mozilla-thunderbird and .evolution (yeah, I use them both, and I did backup my /home-partition). That way all I get to see how the interface looks by default, as I usually configure my interface quite heavily.

Usually I do this only on LTS-releases, but 9.10 had been hyped so much that I felt I just had to....

Edited for typos....

Nalle Berg
./nalle.

Edited 2009-11-01 06:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Buggy, buggy
by kaiwai on Fri 30th Oct 2009 03:09 in reply to "Buggy, buggy"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I just upgraded (it took 6 hours) When I rebooted and logged in I got a crash that totally reminded me of a crashed TRS-80 Colour Computer - low-res characters of random colour filled the screen. After pressing the power button to restart, it booted - this time fine, but no sound. It can't find either the built in sound or PCI sound card.

I think this thing needs more testing.


I'm surprised no one had noticed that the above post is a troll; google "TRS-80" and you'll know why.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Buggy, buggy
by mrAmiga500 on Fri 30th Oct 2009 03:33 in reply to "RE: Buggy, buggy"
mrAmiga500 Member since:
2009-03-20

I'm surprised no one had noticed that the above post is a troll; google "TRS-80" and you'll know why.


What are you talking about? That is NOT a frigging troll. That's exactly what it looked like!

If I could have taken a screenshot, I definitely would have.

Don't make stupid assumptions.


Edit: Judging by the fact that you had to "google TRS-80", I'd say you're too young to even know what that is. So I guess I don't blame you for being ignorant. I do own a TRS-80 computer, by the way. (two, actually.. along with 20 other computers from the 1980's)

Edited 2009-10-30 03:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1