Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 8th Nov 2009 16:11 UTC
Apple We're all familiar with the fact that Apple has trouble managing its App Store. While it is overflowing with applications, Apple governs it willy-nilly, and the web is rife with stories from developers who had their application rejected for no apparent reason. There's now a new issue we can add to the list. Are you an iPhone developer? Do you want a similar, competing application out of the App Store? All you need to do is send an infringement claim to Apple, and they'll happily threaten to remove the competing application without a second thought. Update: And here's a similar case, about Stoneloops! vs. Luxor.
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mrhasbean
Member since:
2006-04-03

In any case, don't let the number of applications in the App Store fool you. Popularity is not a measurement of quality - something Apple specifically should realise all too well.


Been saying that for years in relation to another OS and it's applications...

From another angle though, lets ask this question. As unlikely as it seems by the "evidence" put forward, if DishLoc was somehow legally found to impinge on IP contained in DishPointer and subsequently had to be withdrawn from sale, therefore negating any possibility of upgrades or bug fixes, who would those who have purchased it go to for their refund? The defunct developer, or Apple?

I can see where Apple are coming from on this, however I think the better solution would be to temporarily withdraw BOTH products from the App Store until it is determined where the facts lie. That way neither company is gaining any advantage over the other and more importantly customers wouldn't possibly be purchasing something that may have no future.

Reply Score: 3

kryogenix Member since:
2008-01-06

From another angle though, lets ask this question. As unlikely as it seems by the "evidence" put forward, if DishLoc was somehow legally found to impinge on IP contained in DishPointer and subsequently had to be withdrawn from sale, therefore negating any possibility of upgrades or bug fixes, who would those who have purchased it go to for their refund? The defunct developer, or Apple?


What makes you think you're ENTITLED to free upgrades/bug fixes much less a refund if they stop? If an app is withdrawn from sale, that doesn't mean it ceases to function or you have to destroy it.

The concept of automatic online updates is a fairly new one. One which I'm not too fond of because most software nowadays is perpertual beta quality because it's rushed out the door and they'll "just fix it later". Back when your home computer OS was burned into an EPROM, they were more inclined to get it right the first time. Doesn't mean there weren't bugs however.

Reply Parent Score: 2