Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 9th Nov 2009 21:29 UTC
3D News, GL, DirectX Over the past few years, there have been persistent rumours that NVIDIA, the graphics chip maker, was working on an x86 chip to compete with Intel and AMD. Recently, these rumours gained some traction, but NVIDIA's CEO just shot them down, and denied the company will enter the x86 processor market.
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RE: a no go
by haus on Mon 9th Nov 2009 22:03 UTC in reply to "a no go"
haus
Member since:
2009-08-18

@Phocean

"GPU are not so interesting in computing, only on very specific tasks, and even there nothing so great that would give it a solid advantage."

Maybe on Windows PCs.

For OS X and some instances of Linux, the OS takes full advantage of the GPU leaving the processor to be dedicated to do more demanding tasks. in the end, it can and DOES make a system faster when properly integrated into the OS.

Edited 2009-11-09 22:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: a no go
by lucas_maximus on Mon 9th Nov 2009 22:58 in reply to "RE: a no go"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Windows has damn good GUI acceleration. Desktop Windows Manager which is responsible for accelerating the Windows 7 GUI is taking up 26Meg of ram according to task manager, Skype is using 28Meg.

Windows 7 has pretty good GUI acceleration which doesn't eat up my memory and is damn responsive on this Integrated graphics card.

Anyhow where does this myth come from that you need a graphics card accelerating the GUI otherwise it degrades performance horribly? ... unless your app is using software 3d acceleration or heavily relying on the graphics card to help it with additional processing (Adobe CS4) any CPU in the last 6 years can do at least 1280x1024 any application degradation that you are likely to notice.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: a no go
by lemur2 on Mon 9th Nov 2009 23:15 in reply to "RE[2]: a no go"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Windows has damn good GUI acceleration. Desktop Windows Manager which is responsible for accelerating the Windows 7 GUI is taking up 26Meg of ram according to task manager, Skype is using 28Meg. Windows 7 has pretty good GUI acceleration which doesn't eat up my memory and is damn responsive on this Integrated graphics card. Anyhow where does this myth come from that you need a graphics card accelerating the GUI otherwise it degrades performance horribly? ... unless your app is using software 3d acceleration or heavily relying on the graphics card to help it with additional processing (Adobe CS4) any CPU in the last 6 years can do at least 1280x1024 any application degradation that you are likely to notice.


Windows, OSX, KDE4 and recently I believe also GNOME desktops use 2d graphics acceleration using a GPU.

I have an ATI HD2400 graphics card (a very low end card), but even this very modest and inexpensive graphics card speeds up the KDE4 desktop quite a bit through 2D acceleration. I am using the radeon open source graphics driver, which doesn't have 3D functionality as yet, and it won't have until Linux kernel 2.6.32 comes out.

PS: When kernel 2.6.32 comes out, since ATI GPUs are far faster than Intel GPUs, after a little while ATI GPUs will become the best option for Linux. They will have open source drivers integrated with the kernel, like Intel GPUs, but unlike Intel they will also have performance on par with nVidia GPUs.

Anyway ... the speed of desktop graphics are nicely enhanced by 2D hardware GPU acceleration when it comes to operations such as scrolling or resizing/moving windows, and also for "bling" enhancements like pop-up notifications, hihglights, widget animations, transparency, fade-ins and fade-outs and shadows.

Edited 2009-11-09 23:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: a no go
by kryogenix on Wed 11th Nov 2009 16:14 in reply to "RE[2]: a no go"
kryogenix Member since:
2008-01-06

Anyhow where does this myth come from that you need a graphics card accelerating the GUI otherwise it degrades performance horribly? ... unless your app is using software 3d acceleration or heavily relying on the graphics card to help it with additional processing (Adobe CS4) any CPU in the last 6 years can do at least 1280x1024 any application degradation that you are likely to notice.


Don't think GUI acceleration, think OpenCL and parallel processing. A bad ass video card coupled with a nice quad-core CPU is like having a Cray on your desk.

The GPU ain't going anywhere. Even my integrated shared memory 9400M in my Macbook is useful with OpenCL.

Reply Parent Score: 1