Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Nov 2009 09:31 UTC
Windows Last week, security vendor Sophos published a blog post in which it said that Windows 7 was vulnerable to 8 our of 10 of the most common viruses. Microsoft has responded to these test results, which are a classic case of "scare 'm and they'll fall in line".
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RE: Comment by simon17
by lemur2 on Wed 11th Nov 2009 00:29 UTC in reply to "Comment by simon17"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

So Windows 7 is immune to 2/10 popular viruses even when the user double-clicks the executable and then hits allow? I think that's pretty good!


Just curious here ... how do you imagine that Windows verifies that it was a valid user who caused the executable to be run and then caused a "click" to be registered on the allow button?

It seems to me that Windows doesn't verify that at all. No entry of a valid password is required.

In addition, apparently Windows 7 automatically elevates the permission level of several Windows utilities without even a UAC prompt.

Edited 2009-11-11 00:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by simon17
by PlatformAgnostic on Wed 11th Nov 2009 21:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by simon17"
PlatformAgnostic Member since:
2006-01-02

If he doesn't have malicious software running to begin with, who else but the user could possibly issue the 'click' that starts up a trojan?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by simon17
by lemur2 on Wed 11th Nov 2009 22:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by simon17"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

If he doesn't have malicious software running to begin with, who else but the user could possibly issue the 'click' that starts up a trojan?


A script running in the web browser, outlook or the IM client, sent to the machine from some random on the net.

An autostart script on a USB stick that was picked up when that stick was in another machine somewhwere (say, at the library, or at the photo print shop, or at the kids school).

Any hostile person who has unattended physical access to the machine for a few moments while it is logged on.

Edited 2009-11-11 22:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2