Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 13th Nov 2009 16:49 UTC, submitted by irbis
Gnome GNOME 3, the much talked about next generation GNOME introduces a radical shift from the interface found in GNOME 2.x. Digitizor has a quick visual tour of GNOME 3 in Ubuntu 9.10.
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Whoa, big changes.
by Tuishimi on Fri 13th Nov 2009 17:30 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

Not sure I like the Applications menu thingy. It takes over your entire screen. I guess it doesn't really matter, tho'... if you are there you are trying to fire up an app or perform some task OTHER than using your currently active application - so I don't know why it bothers me.

I agree with the author about the "task bar"/dock app. It's just a shortcut to avoid the paradigm they are working so hard to implement (the application menu).

I hope it will all be somewhat configurable.

[edit]

Actually yeah, I know why it bothers me. It's a graphically intensive operation. That kind of thing can suck up CPU power, and also shimmy and skip if you are in the middle of, for example, compiling several applications or some other intensive CPU task... It seems like a waste or something. But again, if that is the paradigm they are trying to implement, I suppose there is no way around it.

Edited 2009-11-13 17:33 UTC

Reply Score: 6

RE: Whoa, big changes.
by leos on Fri 13th Nov 2009 18:10 in reply to "Whoa, big changes."
leos Member since:
2005-09-21


Actually yeah, I know why it bothers me. It's a graphically intensive operation.


Bingo. On any OS other than Linux that would be ok. Mac and Windows have good graphics drivers, and that kind of thing is nothing for a modern card (or even 5 years old). However the graphics driver situation on Linux is still complete shit for anyone that doesn't have an NVidia card (Intel, even though it's supposed to be free and awesome, is still about 5x slower than on Windows on my machines).

So this full screen menu is going to be laggy on many machines because their drivers are just horrible. It's really too bad that innovative end-user interfaces (Gnome 3, Plasma) are still being shot in the foot by the crappy driver situation.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Whoa, big changes.
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 13th Nov 2009 18:23 in reply to "RE: Whoa, big changes."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I find it all quite... Convoluted. Am I supposed to watch my desktop zoom around like crazy everytime I want to do anything other than switch users?

It doesn't look efficient to me - then again, I haven't tried it so please grab a few grains of salt.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Whoa, big changes.
by JayDee on Fri 13th Nov 2009 18:25 in reply to "RE: Whoa, big changes."
JayDee Member since:
2009-06-02

"
Actually yeah, I know why it bothers me. It's a graphically intensive operation.


Bingo. On any OS other than Linux that would be ok. Mac and Windows have good graphics drivers, and that kind of thing is nothing for a modern card (or even 5 years old). However the graphics driver situation on Linux is still complete shit for anyone that doesn't have an NVidia card (Intel, even though it's supposed to be free and awesome, is still about 5x slower than on Windows on my machines).
"

If the driver's are to blame, I don't see why that would be the Desktop Environment's fault. I for one can't wait for GNOME 3.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Whoa, big changes.
by sbenitezb on Sat 14th Nov 2009 01:32 in reply to "RE: Whoa, big changes."
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Actually Plasma runs quite well in my NVidia 6200 (yeah, what a piece of shit). I wonder how much more good would it run with better drivers. And Gnome already feels faster than Windows XP in the same machine, so...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Whoa, big changes.
by fluxy on Fri 13th Nov 2009 18:57 in reply to "Whoa, big changes."
fluxy Member since:
2008-01-30

For the life of me I can neither understand the logic nor the usability of this new paradigm!

Maybe it can work for netbooks but for bigger screens? No t really. I mean I have to turn my screen into smaller squares each time I fire an Application? And the menu itself is so unintuitive!

Besides I fail to understand the need to include a lot of bling bling in the basic configuration of the desktop. Rather having a robust, USABLE and fast environment in the basic configuration while having the additional glitter being optional sounds much better.

The gnome developers seem to forget one thing, the quintessence for a desktop environment is for it to be transparent to the users rather than be a thick layer of goo, obstructing the user in his/her activities. As for me, if gnome ends up being this, I might seriously consider moving to xfce.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Whoa, big changes.
by vivainio on Fri 13th Nov 2009 22:07 in reply to "RE: Whoa, big changes."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


The gnome developers seem to forget one thing, the quintessence for a desktop environment is for it to be transparent to the users rather than be a thick layer of goo, obstructing the user in his/her activities.


Gnome shell actually obstructs the users activities than gnome2 shell, in the sense that you'll be spending less time finding the correct window.

The best way to verify this is to actually try it out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Whoa, big changes.
by wirespot on Sat 14th Nov 2009 00:02 in reply to "RE: Whoa, big changes."
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

No need to panic, those "new" things are most likely just panel applets, a bit advanced versions of current ones. If you don't like them you can just remove them. I customize my panels anyway. The default layout is ok but I have my own preferences.

Too bad though, when I first saw the icon and the name of the app up there for a moment I thought they FINALLY made Global Menu Applet work (like on OS X, with the app menu on the top bar). I'm still hoping that's what it is, not a simple Window Selector.

Reply Parent Score: 1