Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 13th Nov 2009 16:49 UTC, submitted by irbis
Gnome GNOME 3, the much talked about next generation GNOME introduces a radical shift from the interface found in GNOME 2.x. Digitizor has a quick visual tour of GNOME 3 in Ubuntu 9.10.
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vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

Now don't get me wrong I like their virtual desktop and window manager a lot, its a very attractive and intuitive design, I just don't see why it has to be activated every time I use the menu. That will be very distracting and while I can see why a couple people could desire such a combination, its unsuited for the default behavior.


Launching new apps is actually quite rare, compared to navigating between existing ones. This is only distracting if you typically stare at your current application while launching the new one (as the new app will obstruct the windows of the old apps anyway).

The technology we have now (in gnome2) is dated, because what gnome shell is doing now was not feasible before we got almost-universal compositing capability.

The push towards advanced features like this is actually what makes gnome/kde worthwhile - otherwise we could be (and some are!) using any old fluxbox/xfce/icewm.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sakeniwefu Member since:
2008-02-26

The push towards advanced features like this is actually what makes gnome/kde worthwhile - otherwise we could be (and some are!) using any old fluxbox/xfce/icewm.


So the reason to replace a working and efficient paradigm by a bunch of floating resizing and translucid thingies is that we have 3D graphics card?

I like innovation, but in the common sense innovation means change for good. eg. IE6 vs Firefox 1.5 with tabs or even, why not, having a preview of the window when hovering over a taskbar button.

Replacing easily navigable menus by click through adventure games(minus the games and the adventure) or modal "ribbons" that use half the screen do not fit that definition.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Praxis Member since:
2009-09-17


Launching new apps is actually quite rare, compared to navigating between existing ones. This is only distracting if you typically stare at your current application while launching the new one (as the new app will obstruct the windows of the old apps anyway).


They are two separate functions and the use of one does not require the use of the other. I often start new programs without needing or wanting to rearrange my windows and I often want to rearrange my windows separate from starting a new program. Maybe my workflow is completely alien and everyone else does it differently but it works and I don't want it broken.

I have no problem with Gnome/Kde using new technologies but don't mess up peoples workflow, that was one of the main reasons kde4 was such a mess because they introduced eye candy while breaking basic functionality that still hasn't been restored in some areas. Gnome 3 should under no circumstances make the same mistake.

Reply Parent Score: 1

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

Maybe my workflow is completely alien and everyone else does it differently but it works and I don't want it broken.


You are a lucky guy to have a window management workflow that works well. It has pretty much always sucked for me (kde 4.3 sucks less than others, but gnome-shell looks promising as well), and I'm eager to see real innovation spurred by composition "bling" in this area.

Reply Parent Score: 2