Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Nov 2009 16:13 UTC
Windows Microsoft's Professional Developers Conference is currently under way, and as usual, the technical fellows at Microsoft gave speeches about the deep architecture of Windows - in this case, Windows 7 of course. As it turns out, quite some seriously impressive changes have been made to the very core of Windows - all without breaking a single application. Thanks to BetaNews for summarising this technical talk so well.
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Big woop.
by jabjoe on Tue 17th Nov 2009 17:18 UTC
jabjoe
Member since:
2009-05-06

So they have removed their BKL years after Linux and now use unused RAM to cache disc, like most Unixes have for years (decades?). It's still Windows, i.e drive letters, a registry, faked single file hierarchy (explorer), device files (and OS objects) are still in a separate filesystem world, Win16/32/64 API, it's own standards rather than standard standards and it's still closed.

Reply Score: -10

RE: Big woop.
by Tuishimi on Tue 17th Nov 2009 17:35 in reply to "Big woop."
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Different doesn't always equate to better. Windows has performed well enough up to date, and now performs better. AND I can watch my Netflix movies online with Windows... ;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Big woop.
by bousozoku on Wed 18th Nov 2009 03:29 in reply to "RE: Big woop."
bousozoku Member since:
2006-01-23

Different doesn't always equate to better. Windows has performed well enough up to date, and now performs better. AND I can watch my Netflix movies online with Windows... ;)


That Windows Vista performed well enough is arguable, but that Windows 7 performs better seems pretty much true.

It's nice to see that they actually addressed shortcomings, rather than just adding more features blindly.

Reply Parent Score: 3

*off topic
by Cody Evans on Wed 18th Nov 2009 00:57 in reply to "Big woop."
Cody Evans Member since:
2009-08-14

I personally think that drive letters are easier to use than the way Linux does it, "E:\" vs "/media/usb-disk1/"

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: *off topic
by ba1l on Wed 18th Nov 2009 02:09 in reply to "*off topic"
ba1l Member since:
2007-09-08

The mount points aren't really user visible in Linux.

You plug in an external USB drive, and it shows up, usually labelled only as "4.0GB Disk" or something like that. If you've given the drive a label, that label shows up instead. This is consistent across most applications, and is far better than "E:".

Besides, most users don't notice drive letters in Windows either. I certainly don't - I stopped caring as soon as Windows stopped forcing me to remember what drive letter was which.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: *off topic
by Brunis on Wed 18th Nov 2009 13:00 in reply to "*off topic"
Brunis Member since:
2005-11-01

I personally think that drive letters are easier to use than the way Linux does it, "E:\" vs "/media/usb-disk1/"


Really? I can drag and drop files to my USB Pen drive icon on my ubuntu desktop.. on windows only geeks know which driveletters correspond to certain pieces of hardware..

And the context menu 'send to' function extrapolates this problem.. send to F:\ which has a harddrive icon .. Windows always presumes prior knowledge.. it is NOT userfriendly and never has been..

Reply Parent Score: 0