Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Nov 2009 20:01 UTC
Google Google has just unveiled its Chrome OS operating system during a press event at the company's headquarters, and it's pretty much exactly what we expected it to be: a streamlined Linux kernel booting straight into the Chrome web browser. The code is available starting today.
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cycoj
Member since:
2007-11-04

For me, it was _exactly_ what I expected and imagined it would be. Down to the small details.

*Finally*, some damn innovation in the user space.


Come on?! You call this innovation? We had this > 10 years ago, it's a bloody thin client, except instead of the X protocol it uses http. That's pretty much it.


Ditch the multiple splash screens, the multi-stage logins, the incompetent BIOS manufacturers (Google have supplied a custom firmware)


How does this ditch the multiple logins? You still have to lock into every webservice you are going to use. I agree that getting rid of incompetent BIOS manufactures is a good thing. But multiple splash screens?


Version numbers are gone. Security is re engineered. Safe, silent updates and no more irrelevant nagging.


Security is not re-engineered, safe silent updates? You can do that already with most package managers just turn automatic updates on, it's just not always a good thing, a lot of people actually like to have control over what gets updated.


This is a bold, unflinching statement of the future, and a breath of fresh air. Microsoft and the OEMs could never have done this in a million years.


If this is the future of computing I'd rather not be part of it. I'd like to have control over my information, I'd like to decide which applications I install (and I like to use native applications, they are and always will run a lot more responsive on my computer). This isn't bold, it's what was to be expected from google, and I'm completely underwhelmed.

Reply Parent Score: 12

galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Come on?! You call this innovation? We had this > 10 years ago, it's a bloody thin client, except instead of the X protocol it uses http. That's pretty much it.


Sorry, but that is a mistake and its a big one. There is a critical difference between this and the thin clients of yesteryear. Customers had to buy and maintain the servers that traditional thin clients were connected to - and upgrade/replace them when you they were outgrown. And outside of business environments thin clients served no purpose because your average Joe didn't have a server to connect it to, and even if he did what would be the point of having a thin client for only one user? Not having to deal with a server is virtually the entire point of modern cloud computing (or SaaS or whatever buzz word is popular for it today).

How does this ditch the multiple logins? You still have to lock into every webservice you are going to use. I agree that getting rid of incompetent BIOS manufactures is a good thing. But multiple splash screens?


Pick a provider for managing your credentials. If your a non business user this can be Google, otherwise its probably a internal directory server. Expose the directory through SAML

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_Assertion_Markup_Language

Google already does this part for you, but if you run your own DS youll have to handle that part). Run cloud apps that support SAML (most do - by next year pretty much ALL will). BAM! instant Single Sign On for everything.

Security is not re-engineered, safe silent updates? You can do that already with most package managers just turn automatic updates on, it's just not always a good thing, a lot of people actually like to have control over what gets updated.


You just don't get it. This is for people who DON'T like to have control of what gets updated... Its for people who don't CARE what gets updated, as long as it works and works well and they can get along with their life without having to worry about it. You know, NORMAL people??? Its not for geeks, its for suits and grandmas and high school girls - there are A LOT more of them than of us you know.

If this is the future of computing I'd rather not be part of it. I'd like to have control over my information, I'd like to decide which applications I install (and I like to use native applications, they are and always will run a lot more responsive on my computer). This isn't bold, it's what was to be expected from google, and I'm completely underwhelmed.


And I am completely unsurprised. This is exactly the reaction I expect from most competent and enthusiastic computer users. And it simply doesn't matter because this stuff is not for you. Its for everyone else. And you don't have to like it but eventually you'll have to at least tolerate it because your Boss will make you ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Sorry, but that is a mistake and its a big one. There is a critical difference between this and the thin clients of yesteryear. Customers had to buy and maintain the servers that traditional thin clients were connected to - and upgrade/replace them when you they were outgrown. ... ... Not having to deal with a server is virtually the entire point of modern cloud computing (or SaaS or whatever buzz word is popular for it today).

Ooh, how innovative. Applying outsourcing to client/server computing.

And I am completely unsurprised. This is exactly the reaction I expect from most competent and enthusiastic computer users. And it simply doesn't matter because this stuff is not for you. Its for everyone else. And you don't have to like it but eventually you'll have to at least tolerate it because your Boss will make you ;)

It will come back to bite them all in the butt. Leaving all your information to third parties to be strip mined is a recipe for disaster.

On the topic of bosses. They can make you use this harebrained idea at work, but they don't have control of the private systems of their employees.

Quite frankly, what do I care if my boss deems it a good idea that he should be screwed over by handing the keys to his kingdom to a third party? The skills I have now, can be applied at any employer...

Reply Parent Score: 2