Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 24th Nov 2009 00:02 UTC
Opera Software The Opera team has released version 10.10 of their feature-rich browser. This is the first Opera release to come with Opera Unite, which combines the web browser with a web server, so that users can share data directly between one another, without the need for a third party.
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RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by Moochman on Tue 24th Nov 2009 12:27 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
Moochman
Member since:
2005-07-06

Although it's true that Opera pioneered a lot of features, it seems to me that they're not on the cutting edge anymore. I would say Flock is the most innovative browser at the moment. It has built-in photo-sharing, Facebook, Twitter, blogging, RSS, and e-mail capabilities. I personally don't use Flock as I don't consider myself a heavy enough "social web" user, but for someone who is it's probably the best browser out there.

Firefox is the second most innovative, poised to become the most innovative. Behind the scenes, Mozilla is doing some *very* experimental, innovative stuff. Just take a look at Mozilla Labs:

http://mozillalabs.com/

Projects there include:

Ubiquity: Command-based shortcuts to speed up/automate common actions

Weave: Sync your browser profile across devices

Prism: Run web applications as desktop applications

Raindrop: A browser-based, universal messaging client (e-mail and IM) with a focus on intuitive simplicity and filtering personal e-mails from bulk e-mails

Snowl: RSS reader integrated into Firefox, with an emphasis on tracking online discussions

They also recently sponsored a competition for rethinking the design of tabbed browsing:

http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2009/07/mozilla-design-chal...

Their mobile browser also sports the most innovative mobile browser UI available:

http://blog.pavlov.net/2009/03/17/fennec-1-beta-1/

On top of all that, Firefox has more innovative, amazing extensions than all other browsers combined, and they're all free. A few examples:

Scrapbook: Save and organize web pages or entire websites for viewing offline

Zotero: Save, organize and annotate web pages; specially targeted for use in research papers, with amazing support for citations.

Firebug: Invaluable tool for web developers, lets you view the structure of and modify elements of web pages dynamically

Adblock: Block ads

Sage: Very nice RSS reader

Meebo: Built-in universal instant messenger

...are just a few of the top ones off the top of my head. And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

As for Chrome, it's fast and does a lot to help web developers, but you're right, its UI is hardly innovative.

Edited 2009-11-24 12:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by talaf on Tue 24th Nov 2009 13:25 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
talaf Member since:
2008-11-19

Although it's true that Opera pioneered a lot of features, it seems to me that they're not on the cutting edge anymore. I would say Flock is the most innovative browser at the moment. It has built-in photo-sharing, Facebook, Twitter, blogging, RSS, and e-mail capabilities. I personally don't use Flock as I don't consider myself a heavy enough "social web" user, but for someone who is it's probably the best browser out there.

Firefox is the second most innovative, poised to become the most innovative. Behind the scenes, Mozilla is doing some *very* experimental, innovative stuff. Just take a look at Mozilla Labs:

http://mozillalabs.com/

Projects there include:

Ubiquity: Command-based shortcuts to speed up/automate common actions

Weave: Sync your browser profile across devices

Prism: Run web applications as desktop applications

Raindrop: A browser-based, universal messaging client (e-mail and IM) with a focus on intuitive simplicity and filtering personal e-mails from bulk e-mails

Snowl: RSS reader integrated into Firefox, with an emphasis on tracking online discussions

They also recently sponsored a competition for rethinking the design of tabbed browsing:

http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2009/07/mozilla-design-chal...

Their mobile browser also sports the most innovative mobile browser UI available:

http://blog.pavlov.net/2009/03/17/fennec-1-beta-1/

On top of all that, Firefox has more innovative, amazing extensions than all other browsers combined, and they're all free. A few examples:

Scrapbook: Save and organize web pages or entire websites for viewing offline

Zotero: Save, organize and annotate web pages; specially targeted for use in research papers, with amazing support for citations.

Firebug: Invaluable tool for web developers, lets you view the structure of and modify elements of web pages dynamically

Adblock: Block ads

Sage: Very nice RSS reader

Meebo: Built-in universal instant messenger

...are just a few of the top ones off the top of my head. And that's just the tip of the iceberg.

As for Chrome, it's fast and does a lot to help web developers, but you're right, its UI is hardly innovative.

Chrome UI is nothing new beyond the "tab on top" stuff. What good comes from removing the menu bar beyond eye candy? (and UI isn't all about eye candy, mind you).

Opera also has built in mail, RSS, and chat support since v9 at least, and though it could use some work, Opera mail is actually what I'd use if I didn't need heavy calendaring.

Opera Link works very well and share bookmarks, bars, research history, speed dial and so on across all your Opera instances.

Integrated debugging and developper support in Opera is supposedly good, though I'll admit I used it only once (and I barely do any web developpement).

I'd say they hold their own on the feature side. Now go kick some chrome ass on the speed side and it's all good ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by Moochman on Tue 24th Nov 2009 13:51 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

I admit I didn't know about Opera Link or Mail. Also, after trying Unite I must say the potential is enormous. Just when it seemed Opera couldn't come up with anything new, they came up with possibly the most innovative feature they've ever created.

After trying it, I must say that Opera hasn't let the cutting edge out of its sight after all ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Kroc
by wumip on Tue 24th Nov 2009 18:19 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Kroc"
wumip Member since:
2009-08-20

<blockquote>Firefox is the second most innovative</blockquote>
Let's see...

<blockquote>Projects there include:

Ubiquity: Command-based shortcuts to speed up/automate common actions</blockquote>
This is like Opera's shortcuts and nicknames, but maybe more advanced.

<blockquote>Weave: Sync your browser profile across devices </blockquote>
Opera Link

<blockquote>Prism: Run web applications as desktop applications</blockquote>
Opera Widgets

<blockquote>Raindrop: A browser-based, universal messaging client (e-mail and IM) with a focus on intuitive simplicity and filtering personal e-mails from bulk e-mails </blockquote>
Er, how many IM websites are there? Lots.

<blockquote>Snowl: RSS reader integrated into Firefox, with an emphasis on tracking online discussions</blockquote>
Opera has had a real RSS reader for ages.

So basically, Opera does most of these, and has been doing them for ages, and Firefox is the innovative one? LOL.

<blockquote>Firefox has more innovative, amazing extensions than all other browsers combined</blockquote>
Ad blocking and an RSS reader? Instant messenger? LOL again.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Comment by Kroc
by Moochman on Tue 24th Nov 2009 20:07 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by Kroc"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

You're right that most of these features are not new. However, I think you'll find that if you examine the screenshots and mock-ups of Ubiquity, Raindrop and Snowl, in all cases they have done a complete re-analysis of the requirements and workflow and in many cases introduced a completely rethought UI, unlike anything else out there. This is what IMHO makes them so innovative even though they are introducing "just another" macro facility/RSS reader/e-mail/IM client.

Edited 2009-11-24 20:11 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2