Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Nov 2009 00:09 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Mozilla & Gecko clones A few days ago, we heard about Microsoft planning to include Direct2D acceleration in the yet-to-come IE9, thus leveraging today's poweful GPUs to render web content. Mozilla didn't fall behind: last Sunday, Firefox hacker Bas Schouten revealed a build of Firefox 3.7 with built-in Direct2D acceleration on his blog. His performance tests claim that popular sites like Facebook and Twitter render twice as fast compared to Firefox without Direct2D rendering. More complex sites do not see a lot of benefits, tough. This build requires DirectX 10 and a WDDM 1.0 compatible graphics drive, and thus, Windows Vista or 7. Download it here.
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RE[3]: Comment by kap1
by Praxis on Fri 27th Nov 2009 01:19 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kap1"
Praxis
Member since:
2009-09-17

It won't. Be in no doubt that Firefox is a first and foremost a Windows application.


So are you saying that firefox shouldn't implement technology unless its available right this moment on all three platforms? Windows has a new toy that can give some pretty good performance improvments. I don't see any good reason why it should not be implemented. When similar techs exist on linux and osx then they will be implemented.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kap1
by flanque on Fri 27th Nov 2009 09:42 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kap1"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

I more or less took Firefox to be a platform independant product.

Reply Parent Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

You would think the the rendering engine would be kept independent but this isn't the case. I came across a weird OSX rendering bug that wasn't fixed for over a year.

It should be noted that I have had very fewer problems with webkit browsers when it comes to cross-platform web development. IE isn't a big deal either as long as you can ignore IE6.

I'm not sure about the Linux version but the OSX version of Firefox seems to be a low priority for Mozilla. They should just drop it since it is a waste of time for web developers who assume that they can code to standards and not have to test in OSX.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kap1
by segedunum on Fri 27th Nov 2009 11:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kap1"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

So are you saying that firefox shouldn't implement technology unless its available right this moment on all three platforms?

Yes.

Firefox has always been promoted as a cross-platform application, and it's been a good chunk of the reason why other platforms have had a look-in when it comes to web browsing. It's a large part of the reason for Firefox existing. Take that away and all you have is another browser on Windows.

Windows has a new toy that can give some pretty good performance improvments. I don't see any good reason why it should not be implemented.

They should be thinking about how to implement cross-platform features across all their supported platforms in a sensible manner rather than implementing shiny new toys to the detriment of a good portion of their userbase.

When similar techs exist on linux and osx then they will be implemented.

Not good enough.

Edited 2009-11-27 11:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by kap1
by Praxis on Sat 28th Nov 2009 03:17 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by kap1"
Praxis Member since:
2009-09-17

Even when linux and osx get similar features working its not like they can share the code. It will all to be developed separately so what possible rational is there for waiting to implement it on windows. Your just denying your windows users a great feature so the the guys on linux won't get jealous.

And don't forget that windows is still the biggest chunk of the market, making your windows version stagnate so linux can catch up just can only lose you users. No one is going to give you a download because you bravely made more windows version suck.

Could the linux version use some love? Sure it could, but I won't begrudge the windows version a great feature that gives a pretty drastic performance increase in many cases.

Also if you limit your cross-platform app to the lowest common denominator features you end up with app that under performs on all of them. Its takes more resources to do cross-platform right, and part of that means using the abilities of each platform to the fullest when you can.

Reply Parent Score: 2