Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 30th Nov 2009 23:45 UTC
Oracle and SUN Yesterday (today if you're in the US), Sun released the latest version of its virtualisation solution, VirtualBox 3.1. Among speed improvements and other smaller features, the biggest news is that Virtualox 3.1 introduces something called teleportation: you can move running VMs between machines - servers or clients, different architectures, different host operating systems, it doesn't matter to VirtualBox. Coincidentally, this reminded me of an idea I once had about moving running applications between machines.
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Email between multiple machines
by umccullough on Tue 1st Dec 2009 00:28 UTC
umccullough
Member since:
2006-01-26

Or, the other way around. You're on the train, working on a long email on your smartphone. You come home, and of course would prefer to finish the email on your desktop, with proper screen and keyboard. You just tap a button on your phone, and the mail application on your phone moves over to your desktop, where you can continue writing the email right away.


Gmail.

Reply Score: 4

vortex Member since:
2009-12-01

Bingo... often the best solution is one that already exists ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Gmail.


While probably sufficient, that's not quite there though. You can certainly write a draft email on machine and continue it on another, but you still have to make a conscious action to fetch the email from the draft folder.

Thom's idea seems to have as much to do with preserving the entire application session in the state you left it. Fairly easy for a web app like GMail, somewhat harder for desktop apps...

Reply Parent Score: 3

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Thom's idea seems to have as much to do with preserving the entire application session in the state you left it. Fairly easy for a web app like GMail, somewhat harder for desktop apps...


Well yeah, I understand - but the likelihood that it will happen between disparate systems running different OSes (I know arguably, one could eventually run the same OS on a phone and desktop) in the next few years is pretty slim IMO.

In the meantime, I enjoy roaming Gmail chat discussions between multiple machines, and the nearly-instant availability of drafts from one machine to another.

Enter Google Wave protocol and it's even more instantaneous compared to GMail as each participant of the wave is receiving live updates instantly.

You could conceivably manage a program's running state as a Wave instead...

Reply Parent Score: 3

sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Looks like those rather nasty situations that never happen in real life.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Exactly. Think about this one, for instance.

I watch my television series on two computers - I have an HTPC in my bedroom as well as my living room. They both draw from the same storage space. OFten, however, I won't be able to finish watching an episode on f. ex. my bedroom HTPC before I go to sleep - so I pause. Wouldn't it be handy if instead of having to remember where I left off and scrub until that point on the other computer, I could just drag the video player to the other machine, preserving its state?

It sounds very handy to me, but it would probably require a heck of a lot of work, and I'm not sure if it is a desirable enough a feature.

Edited 2009-12-01 09:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

ggeldenhuys Member since:
2006-11-13

That's what IMAP is for! ISP's simply use POP3 because they don't want to store everybody's email - which is fair I guess. But IMAP so a SO MUCH BETTER protocol for email. Mail is stored remotely including folders and filters. The IMAP server notifies you about new mail, you don't have to keep polling it ever 10 minutes, etc...

I move back and forth between my mobile phone, home desktop and work desktop. I personal emails are all store remotely via IMAP and is always accessible from any device, even my web mail frontend reads from the IMAP server.

Reply Parent Score: 2

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

even my web mail frontend reads from the IMAP server.


But does your webmail frontend automatically save your draft email progress as you're writing it so you can go to any other machine and resume where you left off?

It's pretty handy this way in case you accidentally close your browser while writing an email, or the machine you're on dies (read: laptop on battery) - you just go to another machine and fire up gmail and there's your draft.

Reply Parent Score: 2

felipe_alfaro Member since:
2006-04-16

This doesn't work. Teleportation requires the VM to be stored in shared storage. Hence, if you teleport your VM to your laptop, you won't be able to use it while on the train since the VM will not be stored on your local disk but on the network (and I doubt you can access your network from the train).

Reply Parent Score: 2