Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:17 UTC
Features, Office A few weeks ago, we talked about how the rise of computing, a field wherein English is the primary language, is affecting smaller languages, and more specifically, the Dutch language (because that's my native tongue). Of course, it's not just the smaller languages that are affected - English, too, experiences the pressure.
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SmallTalk
by JoeBuck on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:35 UTC
JoeBuck
Member since:
2006-01-11

I'm enough of an old-timer to remember that it was the SmallTalk language and development environment that probably got everyone writing function and method names like doNotPassGoOrCollect200Dollars().

However, the size difference between the upper and lowercase letters makes the above much more readable than DONOTPASSGOORCOLLECT200DOLLARS(), so we haven't transitioned back to Greek or Latin.

Case-mixing can make text easier to read; it's too bad that English dropped the German practice of capitalizing nouns (it was still common practice in English in the 18th century, see the US Constitution for an example).

Reply Score: 5

RE: SmallTalk
by YEPHENAS on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:49 in reply to "SmallTalk"
YEPHENAS Member since:
2008-07-14

I'm enough of an old-timer to remember that it was the SmallTalk language and development environment that probably got everyone writing function and method names like doNotPassGoOrCollect200Dollars().


I prefer programming languages with do_not_pass_go_or_collect_200_dollars() method name conventions.

Another annoyance are wiki engines that automatically linkify CamelCase words.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: SmallTalk
by bogomipz on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 06:49 in reply to "SmallTalk"
bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

The language itself is called Smalltalk, though. Not SmallTalk as too many seem to think. The correct capitalization just reads better in my opinion, and apparently also in that of the language designers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: SmallTalk
by Tuishimi on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 16:05 in reply to "SmallTalk"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

I was about to post that Greek, Hebrew and Latin used all the same case ...

Besides our old variables in BASIC and FORTRAN were more like BOC (for something like bufferOverflowCounter) or if verbosity was encouraged, BOCTR. Never more than six characters in the OLD days. ;)

Actually, to this day when I think I can get away with it I use 6 char. var. names.

Ah well... that reminds me that I must get back to work. I have dallied too long and not finished my Sprint in time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: SmallTalk - programming started it for me
by jabbotts on Mon 7th Dec 2009 16:54 in reply to "SmallTalk"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Not SmallTalk but Turning long ago in school if not VB and VC afterward; txtName, varName, funcDoesThingy(). I'd suggest that the programming teacher may have learned it from SmallTalk but she was barely keeping up with course book she was reading from. (nice teacher, just not a coder)

Reply Parent Score: 2