Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:41 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Time. Coming. Long. Put these in the appropriate order, and you'll get my reaction to this news. Nokia has announced that it is planning a major overhaul of the user interface to the Symbian operating system, still the most popular smartphone platform in the world.
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RE: Microsoft or Nokia
by Kroc on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:05 UTC in reply to "Microsoft or Nokia"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

All of the above. The entire mobile phone industry has had its finger where the sun don’t shine for the last 10 years.

There was nothing preventing them from making a device like the iPhone, they simply did not have the imagination and motivation to do so.

And they still don’t. I don’t like the idea, but I can readily see Apple becoming No.1 in market share. It’s iPod all over again. Rather than do anything outstandingly new, Apple’s competitors get stuck in panic loops where they deride each new things Apple does and then struggle to catch up with their copies.

Maemo should be their focus. Symbian is a dead end, and when they get to that end they are going to find that they have cornered themselves and are hopelessly behind the iPhone with no chance of catch up.

One platform. One OS. Iterate.

That’s all Apple’s doing. That’s it guys, it’s not hard.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia
by spiderman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:16 in reply to "RE: Microsoft or Nokia"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

The iPhone lasts 2 to 3 days in normal usage. It has 1% or so of market share and is unlikely to get past 5% top. Most people want a phone to make calls and they want the battery to last well over their long week-ends. Then also want it to be as small as possible and they want to be able to share their funny pics with friends, borrow their battery when their one is exhausted (how many times that happened to me!). And they don't even want to pay for it, or maybe $1. The iPhone is far from there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by Kroc on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

And you’re saying that none of those factors Apple can fix in later revisions? What happened when Apple introduced the iPod Shuffle, and the iPod Mini? The iPod was already very successful, but expensive. The iPod mini was Apple’s _best_ selling iPod. They doubled their market with the introduction of that model. They’ve already started doing this with the introduction of the 3G/$99, 3GS/$199 split. What happens if Apple then introduce a new model, and the traditional 3G is subsidised to $0; then what?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by tony on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
tony Member since:
2005-07-06

The iPhone lasts 2 to 3 days in normal usage. It has 1% or so of market share and is unlikely to get past 5% top. Most people want a phone to make calls and they want the battery to last well over their long week-ends. Then also want it to be as small as possible and they want to be able to share their funny pics with friends, borrow their battery when their one is exhausted (how many times that happened to me!). And they don't even want to pay for it, or maybe $1. The iPhone is far from there.


If your analysis of the consumer was correct, no one would buy any smart phone. And yet the smartphone market is enormous. The battery limitation and price for the iPhone is in line with other smart phones (RIM, WinMo, Pre, Nokia).

The iPhone has 10% market share worldwide in the smartphone market, higher in the US. And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia
by vivainio on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:16 in reply to "RE: Microsoft or Nokia"
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

And they still don’t. I don’t like the idea, but I can readily see Apple becoming No.1 in market share. It’s iPod all over again.

Nah. The open technology stack in Maemo will be the more appealing one to third party developers, compared to iPhone and even Android.

Apples lead at "phone-as-computer" is fleeting, we are talking about 1-3 years tops.

I'm personally working to that end ;-).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by tony on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
tony Member since:
2005-07-06

"And they still don’t. I don’t like the idea, but I can readily see Apple becoming No.1 in market share. It’s iPod all over again.

Nah. The open technology stack in Maemo will be the more appealing one to third party developers, compared to iPhone and even Android.
"

What appeals to third party developers is sales. Right now, the market is iPhone. Droid is there now too, with a model identical to the iPhone app store, but the variety of hardware platforms is making it tricky. It'll be interesting to see how the Ovi store (also a copy of the initially ridiculed app store) deals with it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia
by Moochman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 11:28 in reply to "RE: Microsoft or Nokia"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Believe it or not, but the iPhone is still too expensive for a lot of people. Nokia wants to cover the sector of the market that the iPhone doesn't touch. And I can only applaud them for it--more smartphones in more people's hands can only be a good thing for the industry as a whole.

I generally agree with your point about Apple being the only manufacturer with a clue, though. Not only has the software side been unimaginative all these years, but Apple is the only manufacturer in the computer or the phone biz that has figured out that you don't need millions of models to be successful.

To some extent, customers *like* their choices being limited, if it means that every model they buy does exactly what they expect and does it well. The problem with the rest of the computer, mobile phone, and consumer electronics industry (and even the U.S. car industry) is that they think there needs to be one model per every "type" of consumer--and then they end up with half of their models being mediocre, and every one of them being the result of compromises. Not to mention that the names of products are then cryptic number/letter combinations that hardly anyone can remember.

I'm not saying Nokia needs to take it to the extreme that Apple has taken it--I like some of the choice it provides. But I don't think it would hurt it to limit its variety just a little bit. For instance, how many models of mid-priced Nokia candybar phones do we need? Might it not be better to have one iconic model available at any given time?

Edited 2009-12-03 11:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia
by Cymro on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 11:41 in reply to "RE: Microsoft or Nokia"
Cymro Member since:
2005-07-07

Writing Symbian off due to current poor end-user-experience is very superficial IMO.

I was sad to witness the extraordinary little OS that powered my Psion Revo become the stuttering mess that I found on my Nokia N73, but it its heart, Symbian is still an extremely capable platform. It's proved itself more than capable of powering a netbook like the Psion Series 7.

It needs a totally new interface, but having played with KDE 4 a little, I see no reason at all why a Symbian+QT4 can't be every bit modern as Android, iPhoneOS or webOS, or offer the kind of platform that developers want to work on.

Reply Parent Score: 1