Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:41 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Time. Coming. Long. Put these in the appropriate order, and you'll get my reaction to this news. Nokia has announced that it is planning a major overhaul of the user interface to the Symbian operating system, still the most popular smartphone platform in the world.
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RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia
by spiderman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:16 UTC in reply to "RE: Microsoft or Nokia"
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

The iPhone lasts 2 to 3 days in normal usage. It has 1% or so of market share and is unlikely to get past 5% top. Most people want a phone to make calls and they want the battery to last well over their long week-ends. Then also want it to be as small as possible and they want to be able to share their funny pics with friends, borrow their battery when their one is exhausted (how many times that happened to me!). And they don't even want to pay for it, or maybe $1. The iPhone is far from there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by Kroc on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

And you’re saying that none of those factors Apple can fix in later revisions? What happened when Apple introduced the iPod Shuffle, and the iPod Mini? The iPod was already very successful, but expensive. The iPod mini was Apple’s _best_ selling iPod. They doubled their market with the introduction of that model. They’ve already started doing this with the introduction of the 3G/$99, 3GS/$199 split. What happens if Apple then introduce a new model, and the traditional 3G is subsidised to $0; then what?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia
by spiderman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 09:41 in reply to "RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

And what happen when Fischer Price decide to build the best phone ever, give it away for free with a free contract with unlimited data and call and TV and hire naked women to sell it in the street? When they do that, they will have instant monopoly.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by tony on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
tony Member since:
2005-07-06

The iPhone lasts 2 to 3 days in normal usage. It has 1% or so of market share and is unlikely to get past 5% top. Most people want a phone to make calls and they want the battery to last well over their long week-ends. Then also want it to be as small as possible and they want to be able to share their funny pics with friends, borrow their battery when their one is exhausted (how many times that happened to me!). And they don't even want to pay for it, or maybe $1. The iPhone is far from there.


If your analysis of the consumer was correct, no one would buy any smart phone. And yet the smartphone market is enormous. The battery limitation and price for the iPhone is in line with other smart phones (RIM, WinMo, Pre, Nokia).

The iPhone has 10% market share worldwide in the smartphone market, higher in the US. And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia
by spiderman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:57 in reply to "RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

My analysis is correct if you read it with some attention. The "smart" phone market is a niche actually. Nokia alone sells hundreds of millions of phones every quarter. There are several billions phones around the world. Actually, what we call the 'smart' phones is just expensive high-end phones. There is no clear cut barrier between dumb and smart phones. Apple likes to separate the phone market in two in order to appear big. But what defines a "smart" phone really? Any $1 phone can take pictures, have a calendar, surf the web and send emails. The "smart" phones is just a bigger screen, faster processor and shorter battery life.

Edited 2009-12-03 13:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.


Yes, because we all remember the deluge of other phones that copied Apple's "innovations" like no copy-paste, no 3g, no MMS support, a smudgy tap-and-pray piece of crap onscreen keyboard (instead of a proper physical keyboard), etc. Thanks, Apple! </sarcasm>

It's really funny to see the Apple fanboys trying to portray the iPhone as having some sort of massive lead over other devices. Step out of the RDF for a second or two and it becomes obvious that, in reality, Apple has been playing catch-up with the iPhone for the last 2 years. Give them another year or two, and they might actually manage feature parity with Windows Mobile (or hell, even PalmOS) devices from 5 years ago.

Reply Parent Score: 2