Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd Dec 2009 23:41 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Time. Coming. Long. Put these in the appropriate order, and you'll get my reaction to this news. Nokia has announced that it is planning a major overhaul of the user interface to the Symbian operating system, still the most popular smartphone platform in the world.
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RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia
by tony on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:22 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Microsoft or Nokia"
tony
Member since:
2005-07-06

The iPhone lasts 2 to 3 days in normal usage. It has 1% or so of market share and is unlikely to get past 5% top. Most people want a phone to make calls and they want the battery to last well over their long week-ends. Then also want it to be as small as possible and they want to be able to share their funny pics with friends, borrow their battery when their one is exhausted (how many times that happened to me!). And they don't even want to pay for it, or maybe $1. The iPhone is far from there.


If your analysis of the consumer was correct, no one would buy any smart phone. And yet the smartphone market is enormous. The battery limitation and price for the iPhone is in line with other smart phones (RIM, WinMo, Pre, Nokia).

The iPhone has 10% market share worldwide in the smartphone market, higher in the US. And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia
by spiderman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 12:57 in reply to "RE[3]: Microsoft or Nokia"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

My analysis is correct if you read it with some attention. The "smart" phone market is a niche actually. Nokia alone sells hundreds of millions of phones every quarter. There are several billions phones around the world. Actually, what we call the 'smart' phones is just expensive high-end phones. There is no clear cut barrier between dumb and smart phones. Apple likes to separate the phone market in two in order to appear big. But what defines a "smart" phone really? Any $1 phone can take pictures, have a calendar, surf the web and send emails. The "smart" phones is just a bigger screen, faster processor and shorter battery life.

Edited 2009-12-03 13:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Microsoft or Nokia
by Moochman on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 16:25 in reply to "RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

The distinction between smart and dumb phones is actually relatively clearcut IMHO. 1) Does it support third-party apps, beyond simple JavaME or BREW games, that are installable by the user without going through the carrier? 2) Can it browse the web, without being limited to WAP or "mobile" versions of websites? 3) Does it do e-mail? 4) Does it have organizer functions that you can sync to your PC?

Reply Parent Score: 2

BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.


Yes, because we all remember the deluge of other phones that copied Apple's "innovations" like no copy-paste, no 3g, no MMS support, a smudgy tap-and-pray piece of crap onscreen keyboard (instead of a proper physical keyboard), etc. Thanks, Apple! </sarcasm>

It's really funny to see the Apple fanboys trying to portray the iPhone as having some sort of massive lead over other devices. Step out of the RDF for a second or two and it becomes obvious that, in reality, Apple has been playing catch-up with the iPhone for the last 2 years. Give them another year or two, and they might actually manage feature parity with Windows Mobile (or hell, even PalmOS) devices from 5 years ago.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Microsoft or Nokia
by tony on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 13:15 in reply to "RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia"
tony Member since:
2005-07-06

"And like it or not, the iPhone was the genesis that sparked a flood of innovation in a largely stagnant and stalled market of smartphones.


Yes, because we all remember the deluge of other phones that copied Apple's "innovations" like no copy-paste, no 3g, no MMS support, a smudgy tap-and-pray piece of crap onscreen keyboard (instead of a proper physical keyboard), etc. Thanks, Apple!

It's really funny to see the Apple fanboys trying to portray the iPhone as having some sort of massive lead over other devices. Step out of the RDF for a second or two and it becomes obvious that, in reality, Apple has been playing catch-up with the iPhone for the last 2 years. Give them another year or two, and they might actually manage feature parity with Windows Mobile (or hell, even PalmOS) devices from 5 years ago.
"

In 2007, I had a WinMo phone. It was a T-Mobile branded HTC running WinMo 5.0. I had cut and paste, applications (and not just web apps), MMS, and could surf the Internet. And it blew. I mean, it was awful. It crashed all the time, it couldn't handle my large IMAP folder, I never used an app that wasn't included (there weren't any interesting ones anyway).

When I got the iPhone, it really showed the sorry state of smart phones at the time.

All the features in the world won't matter if the interface and user experience is awful. The market almost utterly lacked any consideration for this, and concentrated only on "features". That is what Apple brought to the market, focus on experience, and not features. It was something the market sorely lacked, and is better off now that it's a universal concern.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Microsoft or Nokia
by dragossh on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 14:36 in reply to "RE[4]: Microsoft or Nokia"
dragossh Member since:
2008-12-16

It's really funny to see the Apple fanboys trying to portray the iPhone as having some sort of massive lead over other devices. Step out of the RDF for a second or two and it becomes obvious that, in reality, Apple has been playing catch-up with the iPhone for the last 2 years. Give them another year or two, and they might actually manage feature parity with Windows Mobile (or hell, even PalmOS) devices from 5 years ago.


That's the problem, isn't it? Windows Mobile, Palm OS, Symbian, all of them had a lot of features with no thought to the user experience.

Apple is all about experience first and features second. That's why it took them 3 OS versions to implement basic things like copy and paste. When they implemented it, they implemented the feature in a nice, unobtrusive way. That's why they didn't have a proper multitasking environment in Mac OS X until 2003, when they introduced Expose and no workspaces until 2007.

Maybe that's not for you and me, but for the average user having a great experience using the device matters. And that's why you see a lot of people screaming "iPhone rulz" when in fact it doesn't. That's why you also see "feature check-list" companies like Microsoft who just don't get it fail.

Reply Parent Score: 2