Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 20:21 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Linux Linux 2.6.32 has been released. New features include virtualization memory de-duplicacion, a rewrite of the writeback code which provides noticeable performance speedups, many important Btrfs improvements and speedups, ATI R600/R700 3D and KMS support and other graphic improvements, a CFQ low latency mode, tracing improvements including a "perf timechart" tool that tries to be a better bootchart, soft limits in the memory controller, support for the S+Core architecture, support for Intel Moorestown and many other improvements and new drivers. You can also read the full changelog.
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RE: Kinda sad
by roverrobot on Fri 4th Dec 2009 02:41 UTC in reply to "Kinda sad"
roverrobot
Member since:
2006-07-23

but the one which finally broke the camel's back ...


Hmm, what kind of camel is that? A cigarret? Seriously, I have never heard of 2.6.31 failed to support CPU throttling, power management, suspend/resume etc. As I am currently using it with a very experimental nouveau driver for my NVIDIA card on a powerbook pro, and every thing works just fine.

If this really happens to you, sorry, but my suggestion is that do not pretend to be a pro if you do not have the expertice. Just wait for your distro to come up with a package, or, and even better, avoid using rawhide or similar experimental things. Just stay with a vanilla stable version of a distro.

Reply Parent Score: -2

RE[2]: Kinda sad
by moondevil on Fri 4th Dec 2009 11:45 in reply to "RE: Kinda sad"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I do understand her.

This is exactly the reason, why even though I work maninly on Linux and other UNIX systems, I run mostly Windows on my laptop.

I use GNU/Linux since 1994. The first time I installed it did not even recognize my IDE CD-ROM drive, forcing me to use floppy based install.

Since then I have used most of the well known distributions in different types of hardware.

But still, here we are in 2009 and still lots of things require tweaking to get it working properly, or break out of the sudden.

Yes, Windows does have its own share of problems, no need to discuss them. But it works.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Kinda sad
by tylerdurden on Mon 7th Dec 2009 05:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Kinda sad"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

Apparently, other OSs are allowed to have issues and problems, except for Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Kinda sad
by boldingd on Fri 4th Dec 2009 18:31 in reply to "RE: Kinda sad"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

If this really happens to you, sorry, but my suggestion is that do not pretend to be a pro if you do not have the expertice. Just wait for your distro to come up with a package, or, and even better, avoid using rawhide or similar experimental things. Just stay with a vanilla stable version of a distro.


She did, didn't she? I thought she said she tried both self-compiled kernels and the packages provided by her distro. I got the impression that the update that originally borked her system was an auto-update from her distribution's update system. I didn't get the impression she was doing anything unreasonable, that one could reasonably have expected to be dangerous. And, like Stevie said, WereCatf is a reasonably knowledgable user. I don't think it's likely that user ignorance is the culprit.

Hmm, what kind of camel is that? A cigarret? Seriously, I have never heard of 2.6.31 failed to support CPU throttling, power management, suspend/resume etc. As I am currently using it with a very experimental nouveau driver for my NVIDIA card on a powerbook pro, and every thing works just fine.


I have Slackware 13 64-bit on my desktop at home, uses an AMD Phenom 9850 Black edition processor; Slackware 13 uses the 2.6.29 kernel. I do not have CPU scaling either (I haven't even tried suspend/resume, and I probably never will: I never expect that to work). I have put some effort (and documentation reading time) into getting it to work, with no luck. I'm far short of a kernel hacker, but I possess a reasonable level of technical skill -- certainly enough, I think, that I should be able to follow thru any reasonable procedure for getting CPU scaling to work, if it where possible.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Kinda sad
by Ed W. Cogburn on Sat 5th Dec 2009 01:49 in reply to "RE[2]: Kinda sad"
Ed W. Cogburn Member since:
2009-07-24

I haven't even tried suspend/resume, and I probably never will: I never expect that to work


I thought the same with my system for a long time (back in the 2.5.x days), until, by accident, I suspended the system (2.6.31-rc9), and... it worked. (Wait a sec, how long has *that* been working?!)

Hardware support takes longer for Linux because most of the hardware makers don't actively support it, but the support does seem to eventually get in, amazingly.

Laptops are the worst simply because they have the most proprietary junk in them, compared to desktop machines made with more standard (and thus supported) components.

Reply Parent Score: 1