Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 3rd Dec 2009 22:25 UTC
Intel "Intel's experimental 48-core 'single-chip cloud computer' is the latest step in multicore processing. Intel officials say such a chip will greatly improve performance and efficiency in future data centers, and will lead to new applications and interfaces between users and computers. Intel plans to have 100 or more chips in the hands of IT companies and research institutes next year to foster research into new software. Intel, AMD and others are rapidly growing the number of cores on a single silicon chip, with both companies looking to put eight or more cores on a chip in 2010."
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The problem is the software
by ggeldenhuys on Fri 4th Dec 2009 08:49 UTC
ggeldenhuys
Member since:
2006-11-13

The major problem now is the software. Most software out their today do not take into account multi-core CPU's, so it's as if they run on a single core anyway (mostly single threaded applications).

Yes the OS can do some scheduling, but it's down to the software applications to take charge of multi-cores and multi-threading.

Reply Score: 1

RE: The problem is the software
by Kochise on Fri 4th Dec 2009 09:16 in reply to "The problem is the software"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Erlang @ http://www.erlang.org/ just do that kind of stuff, massive multi-core programming, and with ease and elegance ;)

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I've just not been able to get used to the syntax yet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

The major problem now is the software. Most software out their today do not take into account multi-core CPU's, so it's as if they run on a single core anyway (mostly single threaded applications).

Yes the OS can do some scheduling, but it's down to the software applications to take charge of multi-cores and multi-threading.


This wont be targeted at general consumers (who, for now, most new computers are sufficiently powerful).

This will be targeted at mainframe users who already do complicated distributed processing or server admins who want to consolidate several hardware resources into one host running several virtual machines (each assigned 2 or more cores)

For these users - this type of CPU is the future.

Edited 2009-12-04 14:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

The major problem now is the software. Most software out their today do not take into account multi-core CPU's, so it's as if they run on a single core anyway (mostly single threaded applications).


Depends on what software you are talking about. I guess a 48 core cpu isn't intended for the flash playing/web browsing user, but for servers and hard core desktops (designers, CAD, gaming). Most desktop and single threaded applications won't ever need so many cores.

Reply Parent Score: 2

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Most desktop and single threaded applications won't ever need so many cores.


Except when they're loaded with malware - in which case the more cores there are to run the malware in the background, the better the user experience will be ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

I take intel branding this as a "research chip for cloud computing" was not enough of a hint that this was not intended to be a desktop chip?

Reply Parent Score: 1

wannabe geek Member since:
2006-09-27

Clojure ;)

http://clojure.org

Reply Parent Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

... and that is why this is a research vehicle. Jesus, do some of you bother to even read the article before becoming Capt. Obvious?

Reply Parent Score: 1