Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 8th Dec 2009 19:19 UTC
Legal And we have news of yet another massive copyright infringement lawsuit in the music industry. This one takes place in Canada, and the infringed party is placing a truly massive claim on the infringing party: 50 million USD, with the possibility of it exceeding 60 billion USD. Bad news? Well, no, not really - you really need to consider the infringing party in this one. This is irony not even the ancient Greeks could imagine.
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RE: Comment by Mark Williamson
by AirIntake on Tue 8th Dec 2009 19:35 UTC in reply to "Comment by Mark Williamson"
AirIntake
Member since:
2009-10-29

Yes, in Canada it's true: "On March 19, 1998, new federal copyright legislation came into force. Among other things, the legislation provides for a levy to be collected on blank audio recording media.

It is called a levy (and not a tax) because it is not collected by any level of government, it is collected by a group representing the recording industry. In a letter to the Copyright Board of Canada released Monday, January 18, 1999, the five collectives that filed tariffs for a proposed levy on blank audio recording media announced the creation of the Canadian Private Copying Collective (CPCC).

The Copyright Board decides on the amount of the levy and what media it applies to. The CPCC submits its proposed levies and the Copyright Board holds hearings to hear any objections to the proposed levy amounts. Note that the Copyright Board CANNOT change the law, they can only determine the levy value and the media to which it will apply. The levy can be set for a 1- or 2-year period. So far, all of the periods set and requested have been 2 years.

The first time the Copyright Board set the levy was December 17, 1999."

So of course, I download all the music I feel like. The industry also pissed me off by making me pay a licensing fee to play music I already own at my own wedding. SOCAN's argument is that my private, invitation only wedding is a public performance.

Reply Parent Score: 4

AirIntake Member since:
2009-10-29

Also:
"Can I legally copy music CDs for my friends?

The simple answer is NO, but you can legally copy your friend's music CD for YOUR OWN use."

Reply Parent Score: 3

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Also:
"Can I legally copy music CDs for my friends?

The simple answer is NO, but you can legally copy your friend's music CD for YOUR OWN use."


It's been amusing to watch the CRIA trying to "debunk" that interpretation. It's boiled down to "No, even though you pay a levy on blank media, that doesn't give you the right to make copies. Why? Well, uh... SHUT UP!"

Reply Parent Score: 4

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Yes, in Canada it's true: "On March 19, 1998, new federal copyright legislation came into force. Among other things, the legislation provides for a levy to be collected on blank audio recording media.


IIRC, there is also a similar levy on photocopiers, printers, printer/copier paper, etc, for a decade or two. I know a few current and former print journalists who still get a cheque for a few hundred $ every year as a result of the levy.

The reasoning being that devices like photocopiers will inevitably be used for copyright infringement, so the levy is collected and used to compensate copyright holders for the infringement that's assumed to occur. As a result, small-scale infringement is largely treated as "de minimis" (too insignificant for the law to bother with).

I think that's a much more pragmatic/realistic approach than the RIAA/MPAA has used.

Reply Parent Score: 2