Linked by David Adams on Fri 11th Dec 2009 01:25 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption I was reminded of Sun Microsystems' Scott McNealy's infamous sound byte (used as the title of this article) when I read about Google CEO Eric Schmidt's foot-in-mouth moment during a recent CNBC interview (YouTube Link). Here's what Schmidt said: "I think judgment matters. If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place. If you really need that kind of privacy, the reality is that search engines -- including Google -- do retain this information for some time and it's important, for example, that we are all subject in the United States to the Patriot Act and it is possible that all that information could be made available to the authorities."
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RE[3]: I agree with Schmidt
by sbergman27 on Fri 11th Dec 2009 16:07 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: I agree with Schmidt"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

Hey, who wants Auxx's email and IP addresses?

I do. A PM would be fine.

Seriously, though, I find it odd that we, who are more open with our personal information, providing real names, etc. are on this side of the argument, while the anonymous folk argue that privacy isn't important.

By that, I do not mean that everyone should provide their real names here. I do it because I stand behind what I say, and signing my name to it just seems, to me, the right thing to do.

Sincerely,
Steve Bergman

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

it makes it too easy for people to post politically incorrect opinions, which we all know are false anyways.

Without being able to look into someone's background, how can we judge their motives?

I will also post with my real name.

Yours truly,
.net jerkface

Reply Parent Score: 1

boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

So... stupid question, but, is "D.J. Jenkins" then not your real name - or a portion thereof?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I agree with Schmidt
by boldingd on Fri 11th Dec 2009 17:22 in reply to "RE[3]: I agree with Schmidt"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

I've noticed that too: I'm one of the most paranoid and privacy-conscious people I know, and yet I've made more than enough of my personal information available to track down, at the very least, my work contact information.

And I note, since it's kinda pertinent, that the fact that I could be personally identified has had a chilling effect; there have definitely been times when I haven't posted something, exactly and entirely because I've provided enough personal information in my profile that my real-world identity could be easily tied back to my OSNews forum account.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I agree with Schmidt
by sbenitezb on Fri 11th Dec 2009 17:23 in reply to "RE[3]: I agree with Schmidt"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

I could borrow your name and use it on other places, claim I'm Steve Bergman and nobody would find out.

The most useful thing internet people could do is poison the internet databases with false information about them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

to scan every blog post to make sure that it is legit and doesn't contain lies.

The only people that would oppose such a commission would be liars since if you are telling the truth you will have nothing to worry about.

Reply Parent Score: 3