Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Dec 2009 15:16 UTC, submitted by chully
Gnome Over the weekend, there has been a bit of a ruffling of the feathers over in the GNOME camp. It started with complaints received about the content on Planet GNOME, and ended with people proposing and organising a vote to split GNOME from the GNU Project.
Thread beginning with comment 399483
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
google_ninja
Member since:
2006-02-05

The right to education is recognized as a human right by the United Nations[1] and is understood to establish an entitlement to free, compulsory primary education for all children, an obligation to develop secondary education accessible to all children, as well as equitable access to higher education, and a responsibility to provide basic education for individuals who have not completed primary education. In addition to these access to education provisions the right to education encompasses also the obligation to eliminate discrimination at all levels of the educational system, to set minimum standards and to improve quality.[2]
The right to education is enshrined in Article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 14 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.[3][4] The right to education has also been reaffirmed in the 1960 UNESCO Convention against Discrimination in Education, 1st Protocol of ECHR and the 1981 Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.[5]

(from wikipedia)

As you can see there, the right to education is there as a way to keep people uneducated based on their race, class, sex, etc in countries where such discrimination exists. How does free software and open standards on the internet have anything to do with that?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Johann Chua Member since:
2005-07-22

You mean "keep people from being uneducated", right?

Reply Parent Score: 2

KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

As you can see there, the right to education is there as a way to keep people uneducated based on their race, class, sex, etc in countries where such discrimination exists. How does free software and open standards on the internet have anything to do with that?

If you actually watched Eben Moglen's talk I've posted in an earlier reply to you, instead of being disgusted of freedom in the realm of IT, you would have watched how in detail Eben Moglen explains that the free availability of source code means the free availability of free technical knowledge -- you know.... that stuff that's transmitted in education...

Reply Parent Score: 2

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

mountains of source code available of varying degrees of quality with (mostly) poor documentation is not related in any way to preventing discrimination in education. We are talking about not letting women into school, not allowing anyone to see how photoshop does what it does. Nice try though.

Reply Parent Score: 3

czayas Member since:
2009-04-09

As you can see there, the right to education is there as a way to keep people uneducated based on their race, class, sex, etc in countries where such discrimination exists. How does free software and open standards on the internet have anything to do with that?


When you said "to keep people uneducated" I think you meant "to help uneducated people", right? Well, in my honest opinion, the point here is discrimination, as you say, in "race, class, sex, etc".

Proprietary software is discriminatory. Only an exclusive group of people has access to source code, although probably a significant percentage of that code is based on free software. Another problem, but of lesser importance, is that proprietary software licenses are available only for people who can afford them.

Education and the GNU Project:
http://www.gnu.org/education/

Why schools should exclusively use free software:
http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/schools.html

Why give precedence to Free Software at school:
http://fsfe.org/projects/education/argumentation.en.html

Edited 2009-12-15 13:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1