Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Dec 2009 15:16 UTC, submitted by chully
Gnome Over the weekend, there has been a bit of a ruffling of the feathers over in the GNOME camp. It started with complaints received about the content on Planet GNOME, and ended with people proposing and organising a vote to split GNOME from the GNU Project.
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RE[2]: Spectrum of opinion.
by lemur2 on Mon 14th Dec 2009 22:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Spectrum of opinion."
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

GNOME was never a great project. It was a desperate attempt to undermine KDE, based on the then non-Free QT. Admittedly it succeeded,


How do you figure this?

Of the notable distributions: Ubuntu (via Kubuntu), OpenSuSe, Fedora, Mandriva, Mint, Arch, Sabayon, PCLinuxOS, Ultimate and Slackware all ship both KDE and GNOME desktop variants.

Pardus, Sidux/Knoppix and MEPIS ship only with KDE desktops.

I think it goes the other way: GNU should ditch GNOME.


That is an interesting concept. GNOME is currently a GNU project. AFAIK, it is one of the few GNU projects to refrain from adopting the GPL v3 (is that correct?).

OTOH, GNU itself is a Free Software project (and not simply an open source project).

If the GNOME board want GNOME to move towards being an open source project only, then a split of GNOME from GNU would seem to be quite logical. At least then GNOME would be what it is ... open source, but not Free Software. Truth in advertising.

I have no idea what that would do to its relative popularity.

Edited 2009-12-14 22:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Spectrum of opinion.
by Ed W. Cogburn on Mon 14th Dec 2009 23:05 in reply to "RE[2]: Spectrum of opinion."
Ed W. Cogburn Member since:
2009-07-24

How do you figure this?

Of the notable distributions ...


KDE showing up on those distributions only happened *after* Qt was dual-licensed under the GPL. Prior to that (when Qt was effectively proprietary) it wasn't supported by any commercial distro (AFAIR).

If the GNOME board want GNOME to move towards being an open source project only, then a split of GNOME from GNU would seem to be quite logical. ...

I have no idea what that would do to its relative popularity.


Agreed, and Gnome's popularity wouldn't be effected that much by this change. Its only the incorporation of proprietary stuff like Moonlight that would have a dramatic effect (up to & including some distros dropping it as their primary DE if that were to happen). Gnome's association with GNU is not now important or essential to either one.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Spectrum of opinion.
by lemur2 on Tue 15th Dec 2009 00:11 in reply to "RE[3]: Spectrum of opinion."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"How do you figure this? Of the notable distributions ...
KDE showing up on those distributions only happened *after* Qt was dual-licensed under the GPL. Prior to that (when Qt was effectively proprietary) it wasn't supported by any commercial distro (AFAIR). "

KDE was the desktop for Mandriva and SuSe distributions, and also for more minor distributions like MEPIS, Knoppix, PCLinuxOS et al. Only when KDE 4.0 was first released and still flaky did some of these distributions also make a GNOME option.

Now that KDE4 is stable once again, these distributions are all moving back to KDE4.

"If the GNOME board want GNOME to move towards being an open source project only, then a split of GNOME from GNU would seem to be quite logical. ... I have no idea what that would do to its relative popularity.
Agreed, and Gnome's popularity wouldn't be effected that much by this change. Its only the incorporation of proprietary stuff like Moonlight that would have a dramatic effect (up to & including some distros dropping it as their primary DE if that were to happen). Gnome's association with GNU is not now important or essential to either one. "

If GNOME starts to drift more and more towards proprietary, as appears to be on the cards, then I would suggest it might find waning popularity amongst individuals, but it might gain in acceptance by businesses.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/48972

Edited 2009-12-15 00:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Spectrum of opinion.
by fossil on Tue 15th Dec 2009 02:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Spectrum of opinion."
fossil Member since:
2009-05-29

Not to pick a fight, but I don't think that Gnome has been an install option in Slackware for some time. I installed Slackware 13 a while back and vaguely remember KDE, XFCE, and Fluxbox being options, and perhaps others but not Gnome. A quick check via Google shows a post by Pat V. dated 23 Mar 2005, stating it was being dropped and why.

Be that as it may, if GNOME finds itself in fundamental disagreement with GNU's core principles, i.e. the four freedoms, it should do itself, GNU, and everyone else a favor be leaving gracefully. Personally, I don't care what GNOME does or if there is a GNOME tomorrow, XFCE and KDE,are preferable DE's for me, and I'd really rather use Fluxbox or LXDE than GNOME. Not sure why. Full disclosure: posted from Debian Squeeze, using Opera on an XFCE desktop. Oh, and ... FSF dues-paying member.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Spectrum of opinion.
by sorpigal on Thu 17th Dec 2009 17:35 in reply to "RE[2]: Spectrum of opinion."
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

"GNOME was never a great project. It was a desperate attempt to undermine KDE, based on the then non-Free QT. Admittedly it succeeded,

How do you figure this?
"

Simple: Most distributions use GNOME by default. Even if this were not true, most applications use GTK. Even if this were not true, there isn't a defacto DE.

If QT had been LGPL or GPL or BSD then GNOME would not exist and there would *probably* be a defacto DE and QT would *probably* be the most common toolkit. So, GNOME succeeded.

Reply Parent Score: 2