Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 15th Dec 2009 20:19 UTC
Windows Now that Windows 7 has been out and about for a while, the first balance sheets regarding its success start popping up. Consumer helpdesk firm iYogi surveyed 100000 of their customers, and the results of that test paint a relatively positive picture for Microsoft's latest operating system release - but one problem point sticks out like a big eye sore.
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Mac's & upgrades
by BigDaddy on Tue 15th Dec 2009 21:46 UTC
BigDaddy
Member since:
2006-08-10

I think we can all agree that when it comes to seamless upgrades to new releases, Apple is the undisputed king.


Not to knock Mac's, I have no experience nor interest in them, but I would say that they have an easier time upgrading for a simple reason. They are not supporting an infinite number of possible configurations like Windows and the Linux distributions. Even if you count every model of Mac since OSX was released, it wouldn't come close to the number of hardware configurations of any of the Windows & Linux Distributions releases of the past 10 years.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Mac's & upgrades
by ameasures on Tue 15th Dec 2009 22:54 in reply to "Mac's & upgrades"
ameasures Member since:
2006-01-09

"I think we can all agree that when it comes to seamless upgrades to new releases, Apple is the undisputed king.


Not to knock Mac's, I have no experience nor interest in them, but I would say that they have an easier time upgrading for a simple reason. They are not supporting an infinite number of possible configurations like Windows and the Linux distributions. Even if you count every model of Mac since OSX was released, it wouldn't come close to the number of hardware configurations of any of the Windows & Linux Distributions releases of the past 10 years.
"

Frankly this is a significant part of the value proposition of the Apple OSX combination.

I don't see this as a disadvantage, but rather as an alternative choice which I am glad to have available.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Mac's & upgrades
by BigDaddy on Wed 16th Dec 2009 02:21 in reply to "RE: Mac's & upgrades"
BigDaddy Member since:
2006-08-10

I don't see this as a disadvantage, but rather as an alternative choice which I am glad to have available.


I never said it was a disadvantage, I was merely stating fact. For some people that is appealing. For me, it is appalling. I much prefer piecing together my computers. In an professional environment, I might feel differently, but at home I enjoy playing and tinkering.

I would compare it to the people who like RC cars. Some just want to buy one and start racing. Others want the whole experience. I would be of the latter. There is nothing wrong in either of them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Mac's & upgrades
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 16th Dec 2009 01:27 in reply to "Mac's & upgrades"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

I was thinking more along the lines of Mac OS X's "upgrades" being minuscule compared to Windows (some refinement, a couple new features, etc., over something like Windows 98 to XP or XP to Vista). But that's probably a pretty big reason you mentioned right there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Mac's & upgrades
by BigDaddy on Wed 16th Dec 2009 02:23 in reply to "RE: Mac's & upgrades"
BigDaddy Member since:
2006-08-10

You raise a good point too. Not to take anything away from OSX, but the upgrades are incremental and those can be much easier to handle for all involved.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Mac's & upgrades
by StephenBeDoper on Wed 16th Dec 2009 23:37 in reply to "Mac's & upgrades"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Not to knock Mac's, I have no experience nor interest in them, but I would say that they have an easier time upgrading for a simple reason. They are not supporting an infinite number of possible configurations like Windows and the Linux distributions.


And even with Macs, the conventional wisdom (at least judging by what I've read online) states that you should choose the archive-and-install option - rather than the upgrade option - when installing a new version of OS X.

A brief aside/pet peeve: whenever someone mentions problems with OS upgrades, the fans of that OS (and this goes for both Windows and MacOS) tend to dismiss those problems with comments like "You should always do a clean install instead of upgrading, everyone knows that - what are you, an idiot?!?" If that's the case, what the hell is the point of including an upgrade option in the first place? It reminds me of Douglas Adams' description of the insurance business: "An industry that advertises a service, without actually providing it."

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Mac's & upgrades
by kvarbanov on Thu 17th Dec 2009 10:17 in reply to "RE: Mac's & upgrades"
kvarbanov Member since:
2008-06-16

I totally agree with you, the upgrade has always been a pain for all OS vendors. Less with MACs maybe, as they have to support really small number of hardware configs, whereas Linix and Windows much more. As a matter of fact, I've had more success in upgrading Linux than Windows, but that's on a work machines. At home, unfortunately, I have to be a backup-paranoid and I can't trust MS as a vendor, although my hardware config is pretty straightforward and has nothing funky in it. Nevertheless, I switched from old PC with XP to a brand new box with 7 Ultimate on it. Even though I'm not the biggest MS fan, I have to admit that I was surprised with : the speed of the installation - around 15 minutes, and I was booted into my new 7 desktop. The installation itself is just a few simple clicks, nothing complicated - I don't think that the users are left with room for making errors - there's just no such place. However, I believe, the customizations from Vista and something from the hardware hits those 31%. Then, with totally no experience or habits from Vista, I just started playing and working with the new 7. To me, it's intuitive, fast and very user friendly. The ergonomic look and feel also has to be mentioned. I was able to find what I was looking for in seconds with no additional hassles. Nice job MS, people claim that Vista was bad, which I can't comment, but 7 is really good for me. 4 weeks operating with one single reboot due to software installations, RAM stays under 1G no matter what I do. I also have to say that I'm not deploying funky gadgets or themes, the default one works for me - I spent most of the time in the browser anyway. Last but not the least, I didn't have to install any drivers - everything is done by 7 - this is a big plus.

Reply Parent Score: 1