Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Dec 2009 21:38 UTC, submitted by whorider
Privacy, Security, Encryption This news is already a week old, but it only got submitted to us today, and I didn't notice it all. As it turns out, two malicious software packages had been uploaded to GNOME-Look.org, masquerading as valid .deb packages (a GNOME screensaver and theme, respectively).
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RE: Is it really necessary?
by sbergman27 on Fri 18th Dec 2009 01:38 UTC in reply to "Is it really necessary?"
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

...then packages with installers that must be run as root would be completely unnecessary, and the possible damage would be limited to the user's privileges.

Which for users interested in installing screen savers... would be pretty much everything they care about. Their pictures. Their personal documents. Their email.

Why do people persist in thinking that /etc/logrotate.conf is more important than the user's home directory?

Edited 2009-12-18 01:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Is it really necessary?
by dreamlax on Fri 18th Dec 2009 02:07 in reply to "RE: Is it really necessary?"
dreamlax Member since:
2007-01-04

A compromised system may play a role in something far nastier than a user weeping over files they didn't back up.

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

A compromised system may play a role in something far nastier than a user weeping over files they didn't back up.

And most of those nasty things can be accomplished from a regular user account.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Is it really necessary?
by strcpy on Fri 18th Dec 2009 04:03 in reply to "RE: Is it really necessary?"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


Why do people persist in thinking that /etc/logrotate.conf is more important than the user's home directory?


It is not more important as data. But this line of thinking worries me. It has "Fedora 12" painted to it; Linux is now suddenly understood to be a big single user "Desktop Spin" (whatever that means).

But as the poster above tried to say, if you are able to own, perhaps in addition to user's data, that /etc/logrotate.conf, implying root compromise, you can probably greatly lengthen the period of the compromise as well as hide the detection of it. To name few examples.

Edited 2009-12-18 04:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2