Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 18th Dec 2009 16:58 UTC
Mono Project The Mono project has released Moonlight 2, the open source implementation of Microsoft's Silverlight. Moonlight allows Silverlight content to run on platforms that do not have an official Silverlight client, such as Linux and PowerPC Macs. Microsoft also expanded its patent agreement with Novell to cover all users of Moonlight, no matter the Linux version.
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RE: Comment by talaf
by Kroc on Fri 18th Dec 2009 19:56 UTC in reply to "Comment by talaf"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

team integration, unit test, specs, workflow, etc, etc...


Terminal, GIT/SVN, Python, Latex.

Some people prefer doing things this way. What I’m saying is that even in 2009, using a text editor is still equal in power to any other way and that this means _equality_. Anybody, in any country, with any tools they can afford can compete on the world stage. Can OSnews not see the importance of that!?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by talaf
by boldingd on Fri 18th Dec 2009 20:52 in reply to "RE: Comment by talaf"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

Relevant to nothing, I must interject:

WOOT WOOT LaTeX! And xterm!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by talaf
by sbenitezb on Sat 19th Dec 2009 06:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by talaf"
sbenitezb Member since:
2005-07-22

Terminal, GIT/SVN, Python, Latex.


Usually faster than IDE's way of doing stuff.

Some people prefer doing things this way. What I’m saying is that even in 2009, using a text editor is still equal in power to any other way and that this means _equality_.


Let's be honest, Notepad doesn't cut it for a large project.

If you compare eclipse with emacs, you probably agree that emacs users are seen as more "pro" than eclipse users; the same applies to vim users. But both emacs and vim are really powerful, more so than an IDE if setup correctly with good plugins. But then you could say both emacs and vim *are* IDEs; the difference is that they require more knowledge on how to operate them, unlike eclipse which is a lot more easier to start with.

Anybody, in any country, with any tools they can afford can compete on the world stage. Can OSnews not see the importance of that!?


I could compete perfectly well with pirated software, like a lot of hungry programmers do out there in the real world. Companies already know that and they won't even care, because if you are poor today, you pirate their software to build the next big thing, then you'll get enough money to pay for it in the future. If that wasn't the case, they would be providing their tools with hardware lock keys to make the life of the poor programmers more misserable, but then they are losing potential customers and also making their platform only accessible to those that can pay.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by talaf
by Kroc on Sun 20th Dec 2009 15:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by talaf"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

And rampant piracy creates monopolies with massive, massive drawbacks. Look at the situation in South Korea and China where IE usage is horrendous, with little hope of bringing it down. They are stuck in the Internet we had in 2003.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by talaf
by strcpy on Sat 19th Dec 2009 06:47 in reply to "RE: Comment by talaf"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


Terminal, GIT/SVN, Python, Latex.

Some people prefer doing things this way. What I’m saying is that even in 2009, using a text editor is still equal in power to any other way and that this means _equality_. Anybody, in any country, with any tools they can afford can compete on the world stage. Can OSnews not see the importance of that!?


Fully agreed. My "IDE" has always been four xterms and Emacs. Add version control system and various other tools. I couldn't imagine anything that an IDE could give me.

And besides, most of the hype is just typical marketing crap. That these new "superior" tools give outstanding boost to "productivity", etc. Kind of the same thing as with the classical "Taylorism".

And while I've tried something like Visual Studio and agree that it is a fine tool, I still strongly dislike IDEs. Mainly more because of the implicit things these typically seem to imply; a collar around your neck and that kind of drag-and-drop programming. But maybe I shouldn't dislike IDEs themselves; maybe this is a direct result of badly designed and over-complex APIs that almost every new language seem to carry.

But obviously the bottom line: each to their own, bad carpenter blames his tools, etc.

Edited 2009-12-19 06:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by talaf
by memson on Mon 21st Dec 2009 13:59 in reply to "RE: Comment by talaf"
memson Member since:
2006-01-01

Terminal, GIT/SVN, Python, Latex.


Unit testing? SVN is a shockingly poor SCM too.. GIT is a nice theory, till you try to use it with a large team working on common code or interdependent modules. In my experience it's better to use a locking mechanism in SCM, because it forces methodical thinking and gets developers talking to each other. Non-locking only works in a single developer/widely dispersed scenario. If all the team members are in a single office space, communication works best; locking forces communication.

Some people prefer doing things this way. What I’m saying is that even in 2009, using a text editor is still equal in power to any other way and that this means _equality_. Anybody, in any country, with any tools they can afford can compete on the world stage. Can OSnews not see the importance of that!?


I predict that whatever you produce will either be unmaintainable by anybody except yourself or will fail to run correctly. I've seen this attitude before, usually with fairly novice gung-ho developers. It's all very well making big statements, but results need to be documented, fully tested and stable. To be honest, any coder worth their salt can code in a plain text editor - the reason many don't is more to do with the amount of time they save. That is not being lazy, that is being pragmatic.

Reply Parent Score: 2