Linked by bcavally on Mon 21st Dec 2009 17:18 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Today there are many operating systems available. Every vendor or community round it tries to make it as good as possible. Having different goals, different legacy and different cultures, they succeed in it more or less. We (end users) end up with big selection of operating systems, but for us the operating systems are usually compromise of the features that we would like to have. So is there an operating system that would fit all the needs of the end user? Is is the BeOS clone Haiku?
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availability of software ?
by Ikshaar on Mon 21st Dec 2009 20:47 UTC
Ikshaar
Member since:
2005-07-14

I would say that the "availability" of software for Windows is no doubt the biggest BUT also (with Mac) the most expensive. So the sheer number of applications for Windows is only half the story, I have many more applications on my linux machine - because they are free.

PS: I am not expecting/advocating that all softwares should be free, just stating facts.

Reply Score: 2

RE: availability of software ?
by Bobthearch on Mon 21st Dec 2009 21:49 in reply to "availability of software ?"
Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I've noticed the opposite, that many interesting and good quality many free / open source Windows applications have no Linux substitutes available. I see this especially with games, educational and science applications, software to interact with appliances (cell phone, GPS, calculators), and vintage machine emulators (although this may be improving).

Of course you can spend a fortune on Windows software if you choose. But there's no reason you have to given the availability of free / open source Windows applications, bargain-bin titles, low-cost commercial alternatives, and the fact that software from the previous 10+ years continues to run on brand new computers often with no compatibility issues.

So what are some excellent, in your opinion, free / open source Linux applications that do not have Windows ports or Windows freeware equivalents?

Reply Parent Score: 5

Ikshaar Member since:
2005-07-14

First thing coming to mind would be media library (music and/or video) for example. I like Exaile, QuodLibet and Banshee style of applications on Linux. Most windows applications I know have either bloated interface (mediamonkey), don't read natively ogg files (WMP, iTunes, real) or are just overly design to manage music from one store (iTunes).

Even with ogg codec installed most are designed to force you to use their own format and do not work correctly with other formats.

The centralized codecs of BeOS and Linux is for that matter a huge advantage over Mac and Windows.

Which free software are you finding in Windows that do not exist in Linux ??

Edited 2009-12-21 22:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

cycoj Member since:
2007-11-04

I've noticed the opposite, that many interesting and good quality many free / open source Windows applications have no Linux substitutes available. I see this especially with games, educational and science applications, software to interact with appliances (cell phone, GPS, calculators), and vintage machine emulators (although this may be improving).

I can agree with games and to a lesser agree educational software not being as available on Linux, but science software?
In my experience scientific software is the one category where essentially almost all commercial software is also available for Linux. I'm thinking Matlab, Mathematica, Comsol, Labview ... plus a number of free alternatives. So I would be interested in what scientific software you are missing on Linux.

About the software to interact with appliances, I agree that getting a device to interact with Linux usually requires quite a bit of work, however I'm constantly annoyed by how things are on Windows, where every device comes with its substandard connection software which all insist to run constantly to detect when you might connect the device. So on windows you often end up running several different pieces of vendor software all UI nightmares. On Linux at least if you get it working you use standards like opensync ...

Of course you can spend a fortune on Windows software if you choose. But there's no reason you have to given the availability of free / open source Windows applications, bargain-bin titles, low-cost commercial alternatives, and the fact that software from the previous 10+ years continues to run on brand new computers often with no compatibility issues.

So what are some excellent, in your opinion, free / open source Linux applications that do not have Windows ports or Windows freeware equivalents?


IMO you are probably correct, a lot of the good free/open source software is available on Windows as well. The main thing for me is probably the ability to install a window manager which suits my work flow. Also I would also need to install Cygwin + Unix utilities and soon software installation and maintenance become a nightmare. Why would I try to recreate a Unix-like environment on Windows instead of using Linux, which has all I need (for free). That's my personal reasons though.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: availability of software ?
by silix on Mon 21st Dec 2009 22:16 in reply to "availability of software ?"
silix Member since:
2006-03-01

I would say that the "availability" of software for Windows is no doubt the biggest BUT also (with Mac) the most expensive. So the sheer number of applications for Windows is only half the story, I have many more applications on my linux machine - because they are free.

problem is, windows software includes both commercial AND free applications (with the latter actually being many -if not all- of the same free programs that linux can run, by virtue of them being developed with multiplatform libraries), while linux only has his free applications, plus some non-free ones ("fruition" only like opera or flash, but not "production", design, or content creation ones along the lines of photoshop or autocad)
OTOH, an end user usually needs applications to be productive, and it's more important he has a good tool (ideally, one that matches mental model, workflow, and functional requirements precisely) at his disposal, than to be able to choose among different, but equally suboptimal, applications

thus, an end user won't care how many are available, if most of them they exhibit the same usability, coherence, UI analysis and design (better, lack thereof), if half of them are text editors/web browsers/media players, and if none of them happens to cover the user's professional working domain (say, content production or design)

Reply Parent Score: 3

Ikshaar Member since:
2005-07-14

Research lab here using Linux only software... MySQL, Matlab, OpenOffice, Apache, Eclipse, etc... it all depends what you need obviously.

Reply Parent Score: 2