Linked by bcavally on Mon 21st Dec 2009 17:18 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Today there are many operating systems available. Every vendor or community round it tries to make it as good as possible. Having different goals, different legacy and different cultures, they succeed in it more or less. We (end users) end up with big selection of operating systems, but for us the operating systems are usually compromise of the features that we would like to have. So is there an operating system that would fit all the needs of the end user? Is is the BeOS clone Haiku?
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RE: availability of software ?
by Bobthearch on Mon 21st Dec 2009 21:49 UTC in reply to "availability of software ?"
Bobthearch
Member since:
2006-01-27

I've noticed the opposite, that many interesting and good quality many free / open source Windows applications have no Linux substitutes available. I see this especially with games, educational and science applications, software to interact with appliances (cell phone, GPS, calculators), and vintage machine emulators (although this may be improving).

Of course you can spend a fortune on Windows software if you choose. But there's no reason you have to given the availability of free / open source Windows applications, bargain-bin titles, low-cost commercial alternatives, and the fact that software from the previous 10+ years continues to run on brand new computers often with no compatibility issues.

So what are some excellent, in your opinion, free / open source Linux applications that do not have Windows ports or Windows freeware equivalents?

Reply Parent Score: 5

Ikshaar Member since:
2005-07-14

First thing coming to mind would be media library (music and/or video) for example. I like Exaile, QuodLibet and Banshee style of applications on Linux. Most windows applications I know have either bloated interface (mediamonkey), don't read natively ogg files (WMP, iTunes, real) or are just overly design to manage music from one store (iTunes).

Even with ogg codec installed most are designed to force you to use their own format and do not work correctly with other formats.

The centralized codecs of BeOS and Linux is for that matter a huge advantage over Mac and Windows.

Which free software are you finding in Windows that do not exist in Linux ??

Edited 2009-12-21 22:20 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

First thing coming to mind would be media library (music and/or video) for example. I like Exaile, QuodLibet and Banshee style of applications on Linux. Most windows applications I know have either bloated interface (mediamonkey), don't read natively ogg files (WMP, iTunes, real) or are just overly design to manage music from one store (iTunes).


Media players could very well be an example, but I'm skeptical. You're sure there isn't a Windows media player like those three? There must be hundreds of media players out there.

Banshee is being ported to Windows "soon" according to their website.

I've used WinAmp and several other players in the past, but now tend to simply use WMP or Creative (it came with the sound card). ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

The centralized codecs of BeOS and Linux is for that matter a huge advantage over Mac and Windows.


Both OS X and Windows do support centralized codecs (DirectShow in Windows, QuickTime in OS X I believe). What you're describing is one of those odd situations where users of a "minority" OS have a better experience, precisely *because* they're too small to warrant "special treatment" from Apple, Microsoft, Real, etc.

The lack of a QuickTime directshow filter for Windows (or the lack of a WM codec for OS X) has more to do with business/politics than any technical factors.

Which free software are you finding in Windows that do not exist in Linux ??


Not sure what applications the original poster was referring to, but CDex and VirtualDub are two open source apps that are (so far as I know) Windows-only. Not that there's any lack of alternatives, of course.

Reply Parent Score: 2

cycoj Member since:
2007-11-04

I've noticed the opposite, that many interesting and good quality many free / open source Windows applications have no Linux substitutes available. I see this especially with games, educational and science applications, software to interact with appliances (cell phone, GPS, calculators), and vintage machine emulators (although this may be improving).

I can agree with games and to a lesser agree educational software not being as available on Linux, but science software?
In my experience scientific software is the one category where essentially almost all commercial software is also available for Linux. I'm thinking Matlab, Mathematica, Comsol, Labview ... plus a number of free alternatives. So I would be interested in what scientific software you are missing on Linux.

About the software to interact with appliances, I agree that getting a device to interact with Linux usually requires quite a bit of work, however I'm constantly annoyed by how things are on Windows, where every device comes with its substandard connection software which all insist to run constantly to detect when you might connect the device. So on windows you often end up running several different pieces of vendor software all UI nightmares. On Linux at least if you get it working you use standards like opensync ...

Of course you can spend a fortune on Windows software if you choose. But there's no reason you have to given the availability of free / open source Windows applications, bargain-bin titles, low-cost commercial alternatives, and the fact that software from the previous 10+ years continues to run on brand new computers often with no compatibility issues.

So what are some excellent, in your opinion, free / open source Linux applications that do not have Windows ports or Windows freeware equivalents?


IMO you are probably correct, a lot of the good free/open source software is available on Windows as well. The main thing for me is probably the ability to install a window manager which suits my work flow. Also I would also need to install Cygwin + Unix utilities and soon software installation and maintenance become a nightmare. Why would I try to recreate a Unix-like environment on Windows instead of using Linux, which has all I need (for free). That's my personal reasons though.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Bobthearch Member since:
2006-01-27

I can agree with games and to a lesser agree educational software not being as available on Linux, but science software?
In my experience scientific software is the one category where essentially almost all commercial software is also available for Linux. I'm thinking Matlab, Mathematica, Comsol, Labview ... plus a number of free alternatives. So I would be interested in what scientific software you are missing on Linux.


Here are a couple of educational science programs that I use from time-to-time. Could be Linux alternatives, but I haven't found them.

Seismic Waves, demonstrates how seismic waves travel through the earth.

Erupt, a volcano simulation program released by Las Alamos National Lab.

Two programs, Halo Sim and Iris, for recreating atmospheric visual effects.

Seismic Eruptions, displays patterns of earthquake activity either using a database of past earthquakes or in near real-time over the internet.

Home Planet, a view of earth showing satellite locations, day-night shading, location of moon... very cool stuff.

Orbiter 3D space flight simulation - beautiful graphics.

How 'bout a GIS/map making program that interacts directly with common consumer GPS units? Some of the Garmin software is available for Mac, but nothing for Linux. The National Geographic software is Windows-only. DeLorme software is Windows only.

Some free / open source programs can interact with GPS units also - Terrain, MicroDem, and 3Dem for examples. Each of these is Windows-only.

GeoCaching software for Linux? Two popular applications I've used, GSAK ($25 registration) and EasyGPS are Windows-only.

But that's all 'fun' stuff. At work we use the following science and productivity software: Grapher and Surfer by Golden Software, Office 2000, AutoCad, and SolidWorks. Office 2000 is easy to replace with OpenOffice, but not so much the others. If there are open source alternatives to Grapher and Surfer, I'd be very interested for my own use. Ditto Matlab.

At past jobs I've been around ArcView / ArcGIS, MControl (by Mudlogging Systems Inc), Strip.Log (Wellsight Systems Inc), and All Topo Maps (interactive USGS maps on CD). AFAIK, these are all Windows-only software titles with no decent open source or Linux alternatives.

About the software to interact with appliances, I agree that getting a device to interact with Linux usually requires quite a bit of work, however I'm constantly annoyed by how things are on Windows, where every device comes with its substandard connection software which all insist to run constantly to detect when you might connect the device. So on windows you often end up running several different pieces of vendor software all UI nightmares. On Linux at least if you get it working you use standards like opensync ...

I don't disagree with your Windows comments.

The real hurdle for alternative operating systems is to convince the appliance makers to include software for those OSes with the product. Considering the discs included with each of the following:
Kyocera cell phone, software is Windows only.
Dell PDA, software is Windows only.
TI calculator, software is Windows or Mac.
Garmin GPS, software is Windows only.
Razor PDA, software is Windows only.

Reply Parent Score: 4