Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 1st Jan 2010 15:36 UTC
Opera Software HTML5 Video is coming to Opera 10.5. Yesterday (or technically, last year--happy new year readers!) Opera released a new alpha build containing a preview of their HTML5 Video support. There's a number of details to note, not least that this is still an early alpha...
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RE[7]: Comment by cerbie
by wumip on Mon 4th Jan 2010 07:30 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by cerbie"
wumip
Member since:
2009-08-20

Theora will be supported by Firefox, Chrome and Opera. That's a growing part of the browser market.

What makes you think Theora is a moving target?

Royalties will hopefully help kill H.264. We need an open web, not a patented, expensive web.

Theora will be free to support, and with several major players pushing for it there's no reason for hardware vendors not to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Mon 4th Jan 2010 08:25 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by cerbie"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

"What makes you think Theora is a moving target?"

Its history was just that, until after H.264 came out. In addition, the encoder has taken a great deal of time to get reasonably good.

Another thing, too: I imagine many of the lowly non-professional x264 devs will get reasonably pissed off, if the royalties start to becomes detrimental ;) . That would end up good for several future FOSS projects, I bet.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by cerbie
by wumip on Mon 4th Jan 2010 18:37 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by cerbie"
wumip Member since:
2009-08-20

Of course Theora takes time to settle, especially since there have been no real commercial interests in pushing it along.

But now there are, and Mozilla has already invested, and the result is Theora 1.1. Which is backwards-compatible, IIRC. Which means that the "moving target" argument is moot. All the moving target does is to continuously improving encoding performance, while decoders reap the benefits without having to change.

Reply Parent Score: 1