Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 5th Jan 2010 13:44 UTC
Amiga & AROS After days of wild speculation and ridiculously fast-growing threads on AmigaWorld.net, we finally know most of what we need to know about the new Amiga. This is not just a random PowerPC evaluation board that you can stuff in a generic case - no, this is an all-new system with a custom motherboard, and some very, very interesting innovations - like a fully customisable co-processor. Twenty-five years after the introduction of the first Amiga, this is one heck of a machine.
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poladark
Member since:
2009-07-15

There are two things that are yet unknown about this platform that need to be addressed before any of us can really make a sensible choice in deciding if it is a good product or not:

1) How does the XMOS chip connect to the memory and I/O?

If it does not have sufficient supporting circuitry to give it fast and near-instantaneous access to the memory and I/O buses as well as interrupts and DMA channels then it will be of little use.

2) Are there XMOS development tools available for AmigaOS 4?

My gut feeling here indicates that the answer here might be "no".

Reply Score: 1

Raffaele Member since:
2005-11-12

There are two things that are yet unknown about this platform that need to be addressed before any of us can really make a sensible choice in deciding if it is a good product or not: 1) How does the XMOS chip connect to the memory and I/O? If it does not have sufficient supporting circuitry to give it fast and near-instantaneous access to the memory and I/O buses as well as interrupts and DMA channels then it will be of little use. 2) Are there XMOS development tools available for AmigaOS 4? My gut feeling here indicates that the answer here might be "no".


About I/O XENA has its own indipendent interface slot that A-EON called Xorro in honour of ancient smart Amiga Zorro bus.

As stated in A-eon site:

http://www.a-eon.com/6.html


Thanks to Xena and the Xorro interface, the X1000 offers extraordinary flexibility. We believe that with this easy gateway to the world of 'Software Defined Silicon' and a path to massive parallelism, the X1000 will once more make the AmigaOS platform the best choice for truly creative and unique applications. For custom hardware control from robotics to theatrical lighting, for hobbyist creativity, for hardware hacking and for a multitude of applications we haven't even imagined yet, the X1000 is a dream platform - and therein lies another meaning of 'X', the unknown. It is you, not us, who will define the future.


AND


To accompany 'Xena', we have 'Xorro', a new slot using an industry-standard PCIe x8 form factor to give access to the 'Xena' IO. This will be the route to Xena's 64 IO lines, which are dynamically configurable as input, output, or bidirectional. 'Xorro' will allow bridging Xena to external hardware for control purposes, to internal systems, or to other Xcore processors. This last point is worth more exploration; XCore is a parallel processing architecture, and if you want more power, you can simply chain more XCores together. Reference boards have been made with up to 256 cores, offering a theoretical 102400 MIPS. Those of you interested in high-end imaging or scientific applications, for example, take note.

Reply Parent Score: 2

SamuraiCrow Member since:
2005-11-19

2) Are there XMOS development tools available for AmigaOS 4?

My gut feeling here indicates that the answer here might be "no".


The tools are open-source and written in C++. Furthermore they have LLVM underpinnings so porting code to XCore will be absolutely no problem.

See: https://www.xmos.com/technology/design-tools-source

Reply Parent Score: 2