Linked by snydeq on Wed 6th Jan 2010 20:08 UTC
Google InfoWorld's Galen Gruman writes that the main potential game-changing attribute of the Nexus One - that Google is selling the device direct - does nothing to move the industry past carrier lock-in. "At first, I wanted to credit Google for making a tentative step in the direction of smartphone freedom. But that step is so tentative and ineffectual that frankly I think it's a cynical fig leaf covering the usual practices," Gruman writes. At issue is a political battle regarding walled gardens in the U.S. cellular market, a fight that will take years to result in any true consumer freedom. "The only way we'll ever get the ability to choose a smartphone and carrier independently is for the platform providers that count - Apple, Google, and RIM - to first develop only multiband 'world' smartphones and then refuse to sell their devices (or in Google's case, use its Android license to forbid the sale of devices) to carriers that block or interfere with device portability."
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arpan
Member since:
2006-07-30

Yeah, but what if that other guys gets the unlimited text messaging and sends you a thousand texts.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Yeah, but what if that other guys gets the unlimited text messaging and sends you a thousand texts.


Well if it is your friend then you need to tell him that you are too cheap to get the $5 a month account upgrade.

If someone you don't know keeps sending you unwanted texts then that is harassment and you can have the number blocked and the charges removed.

What most people don't realize is that charges from excessive usage are negotiable. The cell phone companies are afraid of losing you as a customer since people in the US typically sign 2 year contracts and rarely switch companies.

There's also prepaid phones if you don't want to sign a contact. They get pretty cheap which is why you see elementary school kids with them. The phone price is subsidized with the expectation that you will buy more minutes. To give you an idea of how cheap they get I saw a $30 new model nokia at the grocery store that came with 1000 minutes.

Edited 2010-01-08 19:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2