Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 11th Jan 2010 08:10 UTC
Multimedia, AV I followed the hype: Reddit, Slashdot's front page, months of thumbs up on my blog and various video forums by Linux users for OpenShot. Given that I'm longing for a usable Linux video editor since 2003, and given that OpenShot version 1.0 had just been released, I naturally gave it a go, by also downloading its provided dependencies on my Ubuntu Linux 9.10.
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RE[6]: Help needed there.
by spiderman on Mon 11th Jan 2010 20:52 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Help needed there."
spiderman
Member since:
2008-10-23

Show me a developer who says he doesn't produce bugs and I'll show you a liar. In any software development process, there is a developer who tests his software and there is a test team who tests the software against various gtk/xlib versions and patches. One developer can't possibly spend 1 year testing his software, since in this one year there are 2 Ubuntu releases and I don't count all the possible software and hardware combinations that can make the software break.
Now if you want stable software just don't use Ubuntu. Use Debian stable, slackware, or red hat instead. At the very least, use Ubuntu LTS. If you want the latest and the bleeding edge, you are asking for testing.

Edited 2010-01-11 20:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Help needed there.
by boldingd on Mon 11th Jan 2010 21:17 in reply to "RE[6]: Help needed there."
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

Complete agreement. And here here, Slackware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Help needed there.
by tomcat on Tue 12th Jan 2010 05:00 in reply to "RE[6]: Help needed there."
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

Show me a developer who says he doesn't produce bugs and I'll show you a liar.


How does that contradict my response? No [intelligent] developer should ever think that he or she can possibly eliminate all possible defects from his or her code. But it is possible to create unit and integration tests that are reasonably adequate to validate code coverage and conformance to requirements.

In any software development process, there is a developer who tests his software and there is a test team who tests the software against various gtk/xlib versions and patches. One developer can't possibly spend 1 year testing his software, since in this one year there are 2 Ubuntu releases and I don't count all the possible software and hardware combinations that can make the software break.


Reread for comprehension. I didn't say that a developer had to do ALL the testing. What I said was that the developer needs to have sufficient unit and integration testing in place to validate what he has produced. That's a different statement than saying he has to test it with every possible secondary library.

Now if you want stable software just don't use Ubuntu. Use Debian stable, slackware, or red hat instead. At the very least, use Ubuntu LTS. If you want the latest and the bleeding edge, you are asking for testing.


All components will only be as good as the engineering process for the entire chain of dependencies. You can produce excellent code and, if you're depending on crappy code, you have effectively nullified any advantage of writing solid code on your side. Insist that any code you consume is properly tested; if not, refuse to use it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[8]: Help needed there.
by spiderman on Tue 12th Jan 2010 08:48 in reply to "RE[7]: Help needed there."
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23


All components will only be as good as the engineering process for the entire chain of dependencies. You can produce excellent code and, if you're depending on crappy code, you have effectively nullified any advantage of writing solid code on your side. Insist that any code you consume is properly tested; if not, refuse to use it.

The problem is that with FOSS, users will use poorly tested libraries, despite whatever you refuse to use/support. And that is the point I made. The user is free to do whatever he wants, but asking the developer to test software on anything his twisted mind can come up with is unrealistic. When the software breaks on the latest unstable Xlib, don't complain. It was probably well tested against the proper stable build. Write a bug report.

Reply Parent Score: 2