Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Jan 2010 23:38 UTC
Google Ah, and there we have it: another chapter in the discussion between open and closed when it comes to application stores. A phishing application, masquerading as a banking application from First Tech Credit Union, made its way onto the Android Market. It was removed quickly, but the damage is done.
Thread beginning with comment 403853
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Karitku
Member since:
2006-01-12

Interesting argument. It would also mean that Linux application hives or what a hell you call them these days are also faulty, since in essence they are app stores or rather app warehouses.

I do agree that centralized installation pools have problems. I don't however think that issue raised in this news is true problem. Bigger problem is to find anything on those. Look Apple MarketPlace which is filled with clone apps and hoax reviews, rendering it partly useless.

I think major problem with Android store is lack of control, something that this showed. Google should increase control and testing of applications. I still think Android store is best compared to Nazi-Apple Store and Give all Money Microsoft MarketPlace.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Interesting argument. It would also mean that Linux application hives or what a hell you call them these days are also faulty, since in essence they are app stores or rather app warehouses.


I don't think it's a big a problem on Linux since the apps on are open source (ie the package maintainers can go in and remove offending code should there be any).

But obviously, even open source is no guarantee as it's impossible to check all of the source all of the time and furthermore Linux's repository model wouldn't work for the iPhone/Android et al as there's a whole business around the sale of closed binaries on those platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 2

strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


I don't think it's a big a problem on Linux since the apps on are open source (ie the package maintainers can go in and remove offending code should there be any).


How does this relate to open source exactly? Like Apple couldn't go in and remove offending code should there be any. And like Apple, open source "vendors" are not liable, nor claiming to be, to possible "bad software" (malware, software with critical security vulnerabilities, etc.) possibly distributed via their channels.

It is about centralized control, which in my opinion is a good thing. And when you remove the jargon and look this from more theoretical point, open source "repositories" and commercial "app stores" are pretty much the same thing.

Reply Parent Score: 2