Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Jan 2010 14:41 UTC
Internet & Networking Two days ago, Google dropped a bomb by announcing its intentions to cease censoring its search engine results in China, partly because the search giant claimed that attempts were made to crack the GMial accounts of Chinese human rights activists. The Chinese government has officially replied to these allegations. Update: More on the infrastructure of the attack.
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My favorite topic
by v_bobok on Thu 14th Jan 2010 16:51 UTC
v_bobok
Member since:
2008-08-01

I'm sorry, but all the brave freedom fighters constantly talking about China's political and moral censorship and positioning it as so-called "totalitarian practices". For most of us, their words seems kinda correct and full of meaning.

Then how you will describe the USA's censorship about non-republican/non-democratic movement and so on? Or when it is OK for 19yo girl to stick things in her @-hole and show the scene to over a million of mostly teenage audience through a frikkin webcam? Oh, right! Hey, they have "Parental Controls" in Win/OSX systems and the web browsers which is also can be recognized as sort of parental censorship (but in the local family, not the national web space, obviously).

How else you can call it but not double standards?

Reply Score: 1

RE: My favorite topic
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 14th Jan 2010 17:05 in reply to "My favorite topic"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Or when it is OK for 19yo girl to stick things in her @-hole and show the scene to over a million of mostly teenage audience through a frikkin webcam?


Parents?

I'm being serious here. It is the parents' job to raise their children and figure out at what age which of their kids need what type of parental guidance.

I personally never needed a curfew, a be-home-time, talks about alcohol or cigarettes or whatever because my parents knew they could trust me - and I never broke their trust, so they never had any reason to give me any of those things.

My brothers, however, were a different story, and they did need strong parental hands. That's your job as a parent: figure out how to raise your kid.

Oh, right! Hey, they have "Parental Controls" in Win/OSX systems and the web browsers which is also can be recognized as sort of parental censorship (but in the local family, not the national web space, obviously).


If you need to resort to software tools then you already failed as a parent.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: My favorite topic
by helf on Thu 14th Jan 2010 21:25 in reply to "RE: My favorite topic"
helf Member since:
2005-07-06

I wish I could vote you up, Thom.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: My favorite topic - I'll bite
by jabbotts on Thu 14th Jan 2010 17:24 in reply to "My favorite topic"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

USA censorship and news through popularity isn't quietly accepted by everyone unless you think that 100% of people believe Fox Infotainment to be a valid news source. It's really not a one or the other argument as abuses of power go on anywhere there are people in power.

In terms of the poor choices of some hypothetical girl just after turning the age of consent; your ignoring a few things for either convenience or lack of knowledge.

- The original example of a 19 year old suggests a more professional basis. There are laws in place that require she be 19 or older (I believe the law is 18 yrs actually and 19 to drink). As such, there are legal obligations like not providing that video to those under the legal age (18 or 19). By distributing that content to younger viewers, one would be breaking the law. Actually, amateur distribution of such content to those under the legal age would also be illegal.

- Censorship in the home is not like government censorship. One has a right to decide what is not acceptable within there own home though it may be legally acceptable. This is often refered to as responsible parenting. When the children in the home reach 16, they can move out and make there own grown up decisions. Until then, the parent is (or should be) held accountable. Allowing your child under the legal age (18 or 19 again) to view sexually explicit content would be irresponsible parenting.

By contrast, government censorship does not generally decide that at some point, one is an adult and may make there own decisions. It treats the entire population like children who need Uncle to keep them safe from thinking for themselves. It's also more often about what's good for the ruling minority rather than what is good for the general population.

Don't think I'm suggesting that the US is doing it right, they're as much a political mess as anywhere else. It's not hard to cherry-pick a few laws meant to support three letter budgets more than benefit the public. I'm simply suggesting that abuses of power are abuses of power regardless of the title given to the form of governance.

Can you honestly agree with everything the Chinese government does and who it prosecutes for what reasons? (I know, I know, if your a The People you can't honestly answer that question.)

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: My favorite topic
by umccullough on Thu 14th Jan 2010 17:31 in reply to "My favorite topic"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

How else you can call it but not double standards?


I believe there's a distinct difference between having someone censor content for you, and providing the tools to allow someone to censor content for themselves.

Just like here on OSNews - I see that the first comment has been "censored" by the rest of the community via down-modding. This is a tool that has been provided to allow others to "flag" content as potentially offensive (in this case, I was indeed offended by the comment suggesting that others should be telling me what is offensive), but there's nothing preventing you from reading that comment anyway.

Therefore, any system put in place to allow people to censor the content they or their children (since we still give parents the right to make choices on behalf of their children) see, seems reasonable to me.

The real problem begins when *someone else* starts making the decisions for us without our consent or knowledge...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: My favorite topic
by Temcat on Thu 14th Jan 2010 22:18 in reply to "My favorite topic"
Temcat Member since:
2005-10-18

That's easy. Government censorship is bad. Private censorship within the realm of your property rights is OK. What you cite as examples does not constitute government censorship.

BTW, when I saw the words "freedom fighters," "double standards," and the somewhat veiled support of China totalitarian practices (note no quotes here) together, I could easily tell what country you are from. Interesting, isn't it.

Reply Parent Score: 2