Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Jan 2010 17:03 UTC
Internet Explorer France has echoed calls by the German government for web users to find an alternative to Microsoft's Internet Explorer to protect security. Certa, a government agency that oversees cyber threats, warned against using all versions of the web browser.
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RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Delgarde on Mon 18th Jan 2010 19:50 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Delgarde
Member since:
2008-08-19

What other company is expected to maintain updates to programs and operating systems released a decade ago? Mozilla sure as hell hasn't done anything of the sort.


A company that reaps what it sows? A company that encouraged developers to target IE6 rather than standards - and then found themselves in the position where large numbers of people couldn't upgrade because their applications didn't work with anything but IE6?

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by Nelson on Mon 18th Jan 2010 20:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Every browser has it's own quirks, Mozilla's are just as funky as any of IE's.
IE8 also has a quirks mode for IE5/6 level compatibility.

Microsoft's only crime with IE6 was neglecting it's development for so long after it was released. At the time it was released, IE6 had superb support for standards.

People partake in this revisionist history to use to prop up their idealist view of how the web should be, it does not make it true though.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by bert64 on Mon 18th Jan 2010 20:41 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

MS encouraged developers to code to proprietary IE extensions rather than to the subset of standards supported by browsers of the day... They also encouraged users to totally ignore other browsers and code only for IE.
Many of these non standard applications are now incompatible with any current browser, IE8 quirks mode doesn't always work with them and sometimes its necessary to disable many of the new security features.

They also intentionally neglected to update their browser for many years and severely handicapped progress on the web. Had it not been for firefox, it's likely they never would have updated anything either.

If you wrote a standards compliant application and tested it with multiple browsers, then it would run on any browser today and people wouldn't be locked to IE6.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by nt_jerkface on Mon 18th Jan 2010 20:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

A company that reaps what it sows? A company that encouraged developers to target IE6 rather than standards - and then found themselves in the position where large numbers of people couldn't upgrade because their applications didn't work with anything but IE6?


MS really isn't to blame here, it's more cheap companies that don't want to touch working systems until they die. Companies that have local activex apps can still use an alternative browser when they get on the internet.

I've heard excuses for Google about them having to keep IE6 around for testing. That may be true but that doesn't mean they have to open their mail with it. Geez.

Edited 2010-01-18 20:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Comment by Kroc
by lemur2 on Tue 19th Jan 2010 00:27 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Kroc"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

MS really isn't to blame here, it's more cheap companies that don't want to touch working systems until they die. Companies that have local activex apps can still use an alternative browser when they get on the internet. I've heard excuses for Google about them having to keep IE6 around for testing. That may be true but that doesn't mean they have to open their mail with it. Geez.


The particular exploit which this is all about affects almost all versions of IE and Windows.

http://www.itworld.com/security/93045/dump-internet-explorer-now

I've always known that Internet Explorer was an insecure mess, but this latest attacks on Google and dozens of other companies has really opened my eyes to just how bad it really is. The latest zero-day flaw exists not just in bad old IE 6, but in every modern version of IE.

To be exact, according to Microsoft, the same security hole is in IE6, IE7 and IE8 on Windows 2000, XP, Server 2003, Vista, Server 2008, Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 are vulnerable to attack. In other words, if you're running any remotely current version of IE or Windows, you can be hacked. Great. Just great. How anyone on the planet can actually believe Microsoft when, with every new release of either their browser or operating system they claim that they're more secure, is beyond me.


Edited 2010-01-19 00:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4