Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 18th Jan 2010 23:00 UTC, submitted by Michael Oliveira
BeOS & Derivatives And now we're ready to start picking the fruits of Qt being available on Haiku. We reported on the completion of the Qt port to Haiku on January 1, 2010, and now we already have KOffice running on the open source recreation of the BeOS. A modern office suite for Haiku!
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Comment by stanbr
by stanbr on Tue 19th Jan 2010 09:44 UTC
stanbr
Member since:
2009-05-22

Thats great news, but that also makes me kinda worried.

Haiku team, PLEASE, keep things simple. One of the great things in haiku is that there is not 200 different ways to do the same thing. Like in linux, where we have 1000 different window managers, libs, etc. I'm not saying its a bad thing (I'm a linux and open solaris user) but if Haiku wants to hit the end user, I think it's really important to keep it simple.

Porting QT might be a good thing, but then, we have two graphic libs. This should be agnostic to the end user, the UI must be consistent so that the end user can't see the difference.

Also, I don't like the idea of TiltOS. Is this a fork or what? Do you guys plan to merge with haiku? Haiku is not even finished and there is already a fork?..

What I'm trying to say is I really like Haiku, but I think they might be moving too close to a linux-like OS, and in these case, they will have no chance to survive. So, in my opinion, they should keep things simple. For instance, installing k-office should be as easy as installing any other system. Sure, they just released it, it's not finished, so it's ok to be a little hacky to install it, but I really hope they are working hard to integrate things.

And if they are moving to a package system (box) then everything should be there, and not only qt ported things.

Keep in mind I'm just saying this things because I really care about this project! Haiku is a great OS.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by stanbr
by JonathanBThompson on Tue 19th Jan 2010 14:39 in reply to "Comment by stanbr"
JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

Here's the thing, stanbr:

The porting of Qt to Haiku is a sufficient testament to the Haiku developers (of the OS, not separate apps) keeping things simple: any added complexity this brings is much like that of saying Microsoft Office complicates Windows by installing it, because it isn't tied to the OS, and is a separate application and operating environment unto itself. Yes, I mean that in reference to Microsoft Office, which is actually far more powerful of a development environment (overall) than what I learned on in the 80's on the Apple 2, because of a more advanced, complete BASIC along with the ability to call out to lower-level stuff of the OS for many things, along with being an office suite at the same time. A true testament to the complexity and power of Microsoft Office is, of course, somewhat dubious in the results: it had its power proven many years ago by the creation of cross-platform macro viruses :p

Qt is NOT a part of Haiku, and (I'm making an educated guess on this) will never be supported as part of any official base distro by Haiku, Inc. though there will be no effort to stop it from being shipped by third-party distro makers, if desired: isn't that what users really want, to be able to get what they want, as they want, without being unduly restricted?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by stanbr
by cb88 on Tue 19th Jan 2010 15:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by stanbr"
cb88 Member since:
2009-04-23

actually QT integration has been talked about on the mailing list.... probably as a feature for R2 or at least a large improvment of the current API (better layout handleing reduce hard coded sizes & positions etc...)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by stanbr
by StephenBeDoper on Tue 19th Jan 2010 20:53 in reply to "Comment by stanbr"
StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

if Haiku wants to hit the end user, I think it's really important to keep it simple.


I wouldn't worry too much, then - one of the main characteristics that most BeOS/Haiku fans, users, developers, etc, share is an almost-obsessive commitment to minimalism (and I mean that in a good way).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by stanbr
by cipri on Wed 20th Jan 2010 08:31 in reply to "Comment by stanbr"
cipri Member since:
2007-02-15

PLEASE, keep things simple

things, can't be always simple, and they also should not be simple. But I agree that the result must "look" simple. E.g., to hide the complexity.

Qt4 is not yet fully ported, but it already feels quite responsive, perhaps even more responsive than on linux. I tried the latest Arora browser on Haiku and it impressed my how hast and how good it already works. I think that it could be worth, to include qt in the haiku-base and to have Arora pre-installed, just because it works so nicely.

And I really hope, that LyX (www.lyx.org) will also be ported to haiku, and also QtOctave (octave already runs on haiku, so I think qtoctave could be ported with not too much pain).

many thanks to the devs that ported qt4 to haiku.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by stanbr
by darkcoder on Wed 20th Jan 2010 15:54 in reply to "Comment by stanbr"
darkcoder Member since:
2006-07-14

Porting QT might be a good thing, but then, we have two graphic libs. This should be agnostic to the end user, the UI must be consistent so that the end user can't see the difference.


Looks like you haven't used or saw a pure QT app before. QT adapts to its host OS, so when you for example, you run a QT app on Windows Vista, it has the Vista look in its controls, the same when running on Mac and Linux (under KDE).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by stanbr
by umccullough on Wed 20th Jan 2010 18:00 in reply to "RE: Comment by stanbr"
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Looks like you haven't used or saw a pure QT app before. QT adapts to its host OS, so when you for example, you run a QT app on Windows Vista, it has the Vista look in its controls, the same when running on Mac and Linux (under KDE).


Does it emulate the look, or actually use the native widgets?

I have seen it common to "fake" the look of cross-platform widgets for the platforms they are running on, but this is still not acceptable IMO. Firefox tries to do this and it's often obnoxious when you run into differences in behavior that you didn't expect as a result.

The Qt port for Haiku currently uses its own widgets, not the ones provided by Haiku.

Reply Parent Score: 2