Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 21st Jan 2010 19:14 UTC, submitted by igalmarino
Google Only a few days ago, we discussed the most popular YouTube feature request: HTML5 video support. Apparently, a lot of people want a version of YouTube that doesn't depend on Flash (me being one of them), and now Google has honoured their request with the HTML5 YouTube beta. Sadly, video quality needs a lot of work, and in spite of the original feature request, it's using h264 instead of Theora.
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Open Web Content
by openadvocate on Thu 21st Jan 2010 20:21 UTC
openadvocate
Member since:
2010-01-21

Thom,

I agree with you that it is very disappointing to see Google--which is normally quite good at promoting open standards--pushing a patent-encumbered codec when there are non-patented and documented alternatives that even have free implementations available (e.g. Ogg Theora).

As a member of an online content provider yourself, hopefully you can help to steer OSNews to provide all of its content (including audio and video) in open, patent-free formats so that all readers of OSNews can access it on a level playing field.

One such area of improvement would be to offer the OSNews podcasts in an open format instead of only MP3 since MP3--like H264--is a patented file format.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Open Web Content
by larwilliams2 on Fri 22nd Jan 2010 00:36 in reply to "Open Web Content"
larwilliams2 Member since:
2009-12-02

Thom,

I agree with you that it is very disappointing to see Google--which is normally quite good at promoting open standards--pushing a patent-encumbered codec when there are non-patented and documented alternatives that even have free implementations available (e.g. Ogg Theora).

As a member of an online content provider yourself, hopefully you can help to steer OSNews to provide all of its content (including audio and video) in open, patent-free formats so that all readers of OSNews can access it on a level playing field.

One such area of improvement would be to offer the OSNews podcasts in an open format instead of only MP3 since MP3--like H264--is a patented file format.


Yea, because being open is more important than using the best format overall. Sorry, but Theora is crap compared to h264, and MP3 is the only universal format that can be played almost anywhere.

I don't agree that everything should be proprietary, but (in this case) the better formats won.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Open Web Content
by lemur2 on Fri 22nd Jan 2010 01:42 in reply to "RE: Open Web Content"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Sorry, but Theora is crap compared to h264, and MP3 is the only universal format that can be played almost anywhere.

I don't agree that everything should be proprietary, but (in this case) the better formats won.


h264 used to be significantly better than Theora, but late last year a new version of Theora was released, and that is no longer the case.

The current version of Theora (version 1.1) is almost the same quality as h264. There is a link already provided earlier on this thread where you can check it out if you like.

If we are going to have a discussion on "better formats" for video on the web ... lets please just stick to the facts and leave the FUD and mudslinging out of it, OK?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Open Web Content
by memson on Fri 22nd Jan 2010 11:49 in reply to "Open Web Content"
memson Member since:
2006-01-01

One such area of improvement would be to offer the OSNews podcasts in an open format instead of only MP3 since MP3--like H264--is a patented file format.


Except, that excludes most people, who patently don't give a stuff about Mp3 being patented, but also don't want to have to re-encode or buy a new MP3 Player to support OGG Vorbis.

As an aside: maybe if OGG Vorbis hadn't used floating point operations in the initial CODEC it would have gained traction, but they did and it's hard to do those operations when you don't have a hardware floating point capable processor - like most ARM processors used in such devices.

Reply Parent Score: 3