Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 24th Jan 2010 16:22 UTC, submitted by Dale Smoker
Linux LWN.net founder and kernel contributor Jonathan Corbet offered an analysis of the code contributed to the Linux kernel between December 24 2008 and January 10 2010. 18% of contributions were made without a specific corporate affiliation, 7% weren't classified, and 75% were from people working for specific companies in roles where developing that code was a major requirement. "75% of the code comes from people paid to do it," Corbet said.
Thread beginning with comment 405719
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: How is this a bad thing?
by vivainio on Sun 24th Jan 2010 18:37 UTC in reply to "RE: How is this a bad thing?"
vivainio
Member since:
2008-12-26

It undermines the community. Random hacker has increasingly difficult time into getting in, regardless of her possible talents.


Well, the random hacker may be unable to keep on maintaining the contributed code.

Apart from that, if you can hack kernel code, chances are good that someone is willing to hire you to do exactly that.

Reply Parent Score: 5

boudewijn Member since:
2006-03-05

Exactly. It's probably really hard for the remaining group to remain amateurs and not become players.

I'm not a kernel hacker, but I've just gone through a similar transition. Three years ago I was writing Borland C++ code for a closed-source application for a living. Then I went to work for Hyves, where I worked on a mostly free software application. All the time, since 2003, I've been working on KOffice in my spare time.

Then I founded a company with some friends from the KOffice project, and now the company can pay me so I can hack full-time on KOffice and be paid for it! I'm not sad, I'm elated :-).

Reply Parent Score: 6

strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


Well, the random hacker may be unable to keep on maintaining the contributed code.


Except that you need someone from the same company to maintain the code contributed by the same company due to the all NDA shit you have there.

Sorry for my french.


Apart from that, if you can hack kernel code, chances are good that someone is willing to hire you to do exactly that.


Sure, nothing wrong in that. As I said, this is more of a cultural thing. And this might even be a disincentive for companies to release code as open source if it implies that they have to maintain it by themselves. Just look at something like OpenOffice.org.

Of course, ups, I did bad again, I criticized Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2

strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


Apart from that, if you can hack kernel code, chances are good that someone is willing to hire you to do exactly that.


You seem to imply that everyone who contributes are either unemployed or want a software engineering job.

News flash: many people in open source are employed in totally different fields, but hack with the code for other reasons than money. As an example, Con Colivas is a anesthesiologist by trade, and I doubt he'd want a full-time job doing the Linux kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 1