Linked by Kroc Camen on Sat 30th Jan 2010 06:58 UTC, submitted by chrisfriberg
Google BBC News reports: Google has begun to phase out support for Internet Explorer 6, the browser identified as the weak link in a "sophisticated and targeted" cyber attack on the search engine. The firm said from 1 March some of its services, such as Google Docs, would not work "properly" with the browser. It recommended individuals and firms upgrade "as soon as possible".
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Well you obviously lucky enough to not work for a company that says that they support all major browsers. ... some of us have to keep our jobs, which means supporting IE6 .. since it is still a major browser.

Edited 2010-01-30 11:29 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I've walked out of a lot of companies, I've had managers storm out of the room because I wouldn't bend to their will. I put myself through four years of hell before finding my ideal job.

_You_ are the expert. You've worked obsessively with technology your whole life to learn what you have, they are paying you for your knowledge; you know what is right and what is wrong and it is a detriment to yourself to fall into a corporate culture where they are not respecting your expertise. IE6 is bad for the company, will increase costs, increase risks and require untold expenses to move away from when it finally stops being supported by Microsoft. Developers have to force their company to accept that, otherwise both the developer and the company will come to fail, and the blame will be put on the developer for not saying no. That's the harsh unfairness of the position.

Reply Parent Score: 5

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

What don't you get Kroc??

Our customers pay us to have their website working in "Every Major Browser" ... which means supporting the shitfest that is IE6 and IE7 ... therefore my job is to make this stuff work in IE6/7 wherever possible.

That is what I get paid to do. If I don't do what I am paid to do I get sacked ... and I really want to lose my job in the middle of a recession.

Edited 2010-01-30 12:04 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

SReilly Member since:
2006-12-28

I've walked out of a lot of companies, I've had managers storm out of the room because I wouldn't bend to their will. I put myself through four years of hell before finding my ideal job.

Well said! I've done the same but on a systems level. About four years ago I had a job as a systems engineer where my boss, a huge Sun fan, wanted me to implement NIS+ across our Solaris infrastructure. NIS+, the successor to NIS and Yellow Pages, is a totally closed system, with no support on anything other than Solaris, and is deprecated in favour of LDAP. When you start the configuration process the first thing you are presented with is a warning that it's deprecated and a link to a Sun website with tools to help you migrate to LDAP. I pointed this out to my boss and his answer was to do it anyway as we still had one Solaris 8 and one Solaris 9 system running. Both Solaris 8 and Solaris 9 have full LDAP support and again I pointed this out to my boss, telling him that I refuse to waste my time implementing a deprecated and no longer developed protocol.

After many a tantrum on his part, I took my misgivings up a level. I won the battle but ended up leaving a few months later as my working environment became too hellish. I did end up getting a better job as my CV now included LDAP, an open and widely used protocol. The manager ended up getting fired a few months after that for related behaviour.

_You_ are the expert. You've worked obsessively with technology your whole life to learn what you have, they are paying you for your knowledge; you know what is right and what is wrong and it is a detriment to yourself to fall into a corporate culture where they are not respecting your expertise.

Very true.

IE6 is bad for the company, will increase costs, increase risks and require untold expenses to move away from when it finally stops being supported by Microsoft. Developers have to force their company to accept that, otherwise both the developer and the company will come to fail, and the blame will be put on the developer for not saying no. That's the harsh unfairness of the position.

Again, I couldn't be more in agreement. I know that at a time like this, with the world economy in it's current state of weakness, you may feel that anything you do to keep your job is a good thing but in many respects it's at times like these that you can make the most change. Explain to your boss why it's a bad idea to use a certain technology. Explain the costs in time and effort related to first implementing this technology, the hidden cost of security related to that technology and finally the added expense of having to migrate away from that technology in the all too near future. If your manager still does not agree with you, ask him/her to clarify. If you're not convinced, take it a level higher. If you end up getting sacked you still end up with a very good reason for why at your next interview.

Reply Parent Score: 4

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

_You_ are the expert. You've worked obsessively with technology your whole life to learn what you have, they are paying you for your knowledge; you know what is right and what is wrong and it is a detriment to yourself to fall into a corporate culture where they are not respecting your expertise.


Or, quite possibly, you have an inflated sense of your own self-worth and a bloated ego, and you've convinced yourself that idealism & poverty are more important than compromise & prosperity. I've met a lot of geeks who believed one thing or another, and most of them read the future wrong -- and yet they believed passionately in what they believed. Look, I'm not saying that's you, but there are trade-offs in every business. The first priority is to know your customers and serve their needs. If an employee isn't helping you reach that goal, then perhaps that employee should leave or reevaluate his priorities.

Reply Parent Score: 2

graigsmith Member since:
2006-04-05

ie 6 isn't a major browser, it's an old version of a major browser. they seriously need to just have every website block browsers that aren't the newest version of internet explorer.

Reply Parent Score: 3

rebus Member since:
2009-10-25

Who needs to do that?

20% market share makes IE6 major browser, regardless how slow, buggy and obsolete it is.

Refusing to support it will just make your clients go elsewhere, and I don't blame them, they should have their web usable for this fifth of web surfers.

Reply Parent Score: 2