Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Jan 2010 22:42 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless During the iPad presentation, I was rather perplexed by Apple's claim to be the largest mobile device company in the world. Apparently, I wasn't the only one scratching his head, as Nokia itself, and even the Financial Times, is calling Apple out on its juggling with figures and definitions.
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Chaos_One
Member since:
2005-07-18

So an iPhone isn't a mobile device either, as they are closer to general purpose than to special purpose and a mobile device isn't a device that is mobile, but it's a device that has a single purpose. Wicked.

Reply Parent Score: 1

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

So an iPhone isn't a mobile device either, as they are closer to general purpose than to special purpose and a mobile device isn't a device that is mobile, but it's a device that has a single purpose. Wicked.


Again, that's not only pedantic, it's not even an accurate interpretation of what I said. First of all, I never said that a mobile device had a single purpose, I said it was a special purpose device compared to a generic PC, representing a subset of the functionality you can achieve with a PC. Second, I never said the iPhone was closer to a PC than being a mobile phone.

If you're going to really drag this out, then use this simple acid test: would the iPhone be an acceptable replacement for a laptop for the majority of laptop users? Would a laptop with an GSM card be an acceptable replacement for an iPhone for the majority of iPhone users? I think a reasonable person would answer no, because they are different types of products.

I'll admit the lines are blurring, but we're hardly at the point where we can consider a mobile phone to be the equivalent of a laptop. Would you categorize an iPad or iPhone to be the equivalent of a flat panel TV? They're both capable of displaying video, and higher end TVs are starting to come with built in web-browsing etc., but they aim at entirely different markets due to their entirely different primary purposes.

The fact that they have some overlap in functionality doesn't make them functionally equivalent overall.

You really think otherwise?

Reply Parent Score: 3

Chaos_One Member since:
2005-07-18

My problem isn't with the functions of the device.

This all started with Steve saying Apple makes a lot of mobile devices, in fact most stuff they sell is mobile and he included MacBooks. Apparently Nokia disagrees and Thom too (but he hates Apple despite buying an iPhone).

The only argument I've read here against a laptop being considered a mobile device is not that it's not a device or not mobile, but that some sort of unofficial definition of "mobile devices" doesn't include laptops.

To me "mobile devices" is a very general and broad term and I think you can include anything within this term when it's device and it's mobile.

Now within this broad term you have categories like handhelds, palm tops, netbook, laptops, PDA's, etc...

I'm not comparing a laptop with a cell phone, calling a cell phone a computer or pretending an iPhone is a laptop. What I am claiming is that Steve was right when he said laptops are mobile devices.

Why should a laptop not be considered a mobile device? A laptop is even intended to be mobile, that's the whole purpose of it. If you'd never move it you might as well pay less and get higher specced hardware for a desktop computer.

Reply Parent Score: 1