Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 31st Jan 2010 14:20 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Internet & Networking Despite the recent interest in adopting HTML5's video tag, there is still one major problem: there is no mandated standard video codec for the video tag. The two main contestants are the proprietary and patended h264, and the open and free Theora. In a comment on an LWN.net article about this problematic situation, LWN reader Trelane posted an email exchange he had with MPEG-LA, which should further cement Theora as the obvious choice.
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RE[3]: Theora
by unoengborg on Sun 31st Jan 2010 18:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Theora"
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

"That's another reason why Mozilla should've opted for a GStreamer-based solution right from the start.

You must be joking. GStreamer is a terrible mess ... please.
"

If GStreamer actually is a terrible mess, that is a problem, but a browser should not implement this kind of things in its own code. It should use whatever services provided by the OS where it runs. That way we don't reinvent the wheel and if there is a problem in the OS level services it is better to fix them at that level, as this will benefit all software using them not just the browser. Using services provided by the OS is also much more future proof, if better codecs shows up in the future the browser could make them autmagically, without any upgrades.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Theora
by KAMiKAZOW on Sun 31st Jan 2010 19:41 in reply to "RE[3]: Theora"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

It should use whatever services provided by the OS where it runs.

GStreamer also runs on Windows and Mac OS X. Providing different back-ends in not needed.
As an alternative to GStreamer, Mozilla could also use Xine (compiled without patented codecs -- perfectly possible). Dirac would still be part of it, as far as I know Xine.

Reply Parent Score: 2