Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Feb 2010 20:13 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Ah, the ARM chip. ARM is a hugely successful architecture, and can be found in just about every cell phone or other small device out there. ARM, however, wants more, and for a long time now we've been hearing predictions about an upcoming massive rise in ARM netbooks - so far, this hasn't materialised. Warren East, ARM's CEO, said in an interview with PC Pro that netbooks could one day make up 90% of the laptop market - preferably powered by ARM processors of course.
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it's in the pipe lines
by poundsmack on Wed 3rd Feb 2010 20:25 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

MS knows the massive growth potential with the growing presence of ARM based products as well Microsoft's need to support multi platforms. This is where the Helios project comes in. It doesnt just relate to MS's mobile and CE efforts but to future versions of windows. I think OSnews did an article about it at one point, ah found it, http://www.osnews.com/story/22251/Another_Microsoft_Research_Operat.....

MS is getting ready, think Windows 9

more info here http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/81154/helios.pdf

Reply Score: 2

RE: it's in the pipe lines
by kragil on Wed 3rd Feb 2010 21:30 in reply to "it's in the pipe lines"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Well the common internet conspiracy theory is that the when cheap Linux netbooks with ARM were all the craze at CES 2008 MS and Intel intervened and paid their way to not have them materialize...

There might be some truth in that (ARM+Linux on a massive scale would be very bad for business for Wintel), but I think just now ARM with those Cortex A8 and A9 are able to run Linux really fast so that you can have powerful machines that are useful.

Apple and Google (and maybe Canonical in their litte way) will help this trend towards cheaper smaller computers (netbooks, tablets, smartbooks)

I think he could be right .. a perfect storm for Wintel might be brewing.

Worldwide 90% of smartbooks (smaller netbooks, not laptops) and tablets running ARM is possible by 2012, but the world will end once that happens ;)

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: it's in the pipe lines
by lemur2 on Wed 3rd Feb 2010 22:25 in reply to "RE: it's in the pipe lines"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Well the common internet conspiracy theory is that the when cheap Linux netbooks with ARM were all the craze at CES 2008 MS and Intel intervened and paid their way to not have them materialize... There might be some truth in that (ARM+Linux on a massive scale would be very bad for business for Wintel),


It was an actual ASUS machine, it was displayed on one day (at I tink it was CES 2008) and generated a lot of buzz, and it was withdrawn the very next day.

They didn't get the cover story clear, because after it was withdrawn two different ASUS represenatives, when quizzed about it, gave two different reasons for the withdrawal. The ASUS CEO even brought some extra unwanted attention to it by apologizing.

Since when has a CEO had to apologize for displaying a new product at a trade show?

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: it's in the pipe lines
by shotsman on Wed 3rd Feb 2010 22:47 in reply to "it's in the pipe lines"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

My take on this is that it might be that Windows 9 will run on ARm but I think that by the time this happens they may well have missed the boat.
Why?
It is not Microsoft that will dictate if the port of Windows to ARM is a success, it is the non Microsoft applications that the users will demand.
IMHO, the time lag will give the likes of Google & Canonical to make their packaged offerings much slicker for the key success factors. Many of the apps that MS would have to rely on for their package to be a success are already in a standard Linux distro.

Just my 2c worth

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: it's in the pipe lines
by strcpy on Thu 4th Feb 2010 04:39 in reply to "RE: it's in the pipe lines"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20


It is not Microsoft that will dictate if the port of Windows to ARM is a success, it is the non Microsoft applications that the users will demand.


While I agree with you partially, I think we typically miss the mark with this kind of discussion.

If there is sufficient demand, I am entirely sure that most of the x86 Windows applications will be ported to ARM. And, well, even the word "port" is too strong here; for an user space application, ARM just a CPU architecture and in majority of cases recompilation (with perhaps some minor maintenance) is the only thing required.

As for the article, I am not sure to whom the guy is speaking to. To me, it sounded like it might be the shareholders.


IMHO, the time lag will give the likes of Google & Canonical to make their packaged offerings much slicker for the key success factors. Many of the apps that MS would have to rely on for their package to be a success are already in a standard Linux distro.


And then there is the question whether these applications in Linux distributions really are comparable to their Windows equivalents.

Perhaps the last episode (you know, the original "Linux on netbooks") in this crusade against M-dollar-sign showed that consumers really did not fancy Linux.

Edited 2010-02-04 04:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2