Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 4th Feb 2010 20:48 UTC
Microsoft Now this is something you don't read every day. Dick Brass, vice president at Microsoft from 1997 to 2004, has written an article for The New York Times' Op-Ed section, detailing the flaws in Microsoft's corporate culture, and how they've severely affected the company in a negative way. Telling, and painful. And, in a way, very sad. Update: Microsoft responds. "For Microsoft, it is not sufficient to simply have a good idea, or a great idea, or even a cool idea. We measure our work by its broad impact."
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Sounds like a disgruntled ex-employee
by Zoidberg on Thu 4th Feb 2010 20:59 UTC
Zoidberg
Member since:
2006-02-11

Cleartype has been in Windows since XP, but it was not enabled by default and for very good reason. Most people at the time still had CRT displays which do not work well with Cleartype at all. Tablet PCs were not very common ten years ago either. I know Microsoft has made mistakes but it's easy to be a Monday morning quarterback. This guy is just spouting a bunch of rubbish.

Edited 2010-02-04 20:59 UTC

Reply Score: 5

Shakey Member since:
2005-10-11

I really have to agree.

His tone sounds very professional but coated in resentment. Although, he makes some convincing points, I am left considering the source.

Do we know why he is not with Microsoft anymore?

Reply Parent Score: 0

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

While he does have some very good examples and valid points, I would also take strong consideration in the response. A company this large simply can not maneuver like a speed boat. Then again, in rough seas would you rather be on a speed boat or a battleship? While this may not be as satisfying to geeks who have an addiction to having the latest greatest cool new tech at their fingertips, it also is simply not the proper way to run a business of this size. Zoidberg actually makes a better or precise counter argument, that involving Cleartype. I would simply add how many out there had LCD monitors prior to XP?

Well anyways, since this is a topic regarding Microsoft, I guess it's time to sit back, grab some popcorn, and enjoy the wave of emotional responses.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

I read an excerpt of this guy's piece at another web site and he complained that the Office team didn't make stylus-friendly versions of Office in order to take advantage of TabletPC's features. But the Office apps support Ink and and hand writing recognition. In particular, Word and especially OneNote do wonders with stylus input. What more does he want? iWork for iPad looks like it sucks, I hope that's not what he's looking for in a Tabletized version of Office.

Anyway, this guy's clearly disgruntled and hasn't been with the company since 6 years ago. He doesn't know what's going on at Microsoft now. Microsoft has innovative stuff like Sync (which is a highly praised feature of Ford cars), Natal, Xbox live, Surface, Photosync, Silverlight adaptive video streaming, .NET, F#, C# 4.0, advanced voice recognition, Media Center, etc.

OK, fine, Apple has the iPad (which I gather was the impetus of this article). But the online buzz is negative, and it has a whiff of AppleTV about it. We'll see what happens with it, but I think it could be a bust just as easily as a success.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MORB Member since:
2005-07-06

Thanks, captain obvious.

He is obviously an ex-employee, and a disgruntled one, and I think his story explains why.

Reply Parent Score: 4

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Cleartype has been in Windows since XP, but it was not enabled by default and for very good reason. Most people at the time still had CRT displays which do not work well with Cleartype at all. Tablet PCs were not very common ten years ago either. I know Microsoft has made mistakes but it's easy to be a Monday morning quarterback. This guy is just spouting a bunch of rubbish.


His post is not about technology, but about management. And there is/was a lot of rivalry between divisions at Microsoft. In fact, a lot of multinationals that have clear cut divisions have those "rivalries".
Why I am confident about my statements? I have a good friend that was working for some time at Microsoft, in management. Also a lot of manager friends at other big guys of corporate IT: Oracle, Cisco, IBM ...
Not to mention that I work for a big multinational.

Reply Parent Score: 1