Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 8th Feb 2010 19:38 UTC
IBM "The scuttlebutt is that IBM seemed perfectly content to wait until May to launch the Power7-based Power Systems servers, but something changed and compelled the company to move up the announcement of its first machines using the eight-core processor to today. Big Blue is not in a habit of explaining its motives or its timing for product launches, but it seems clear that IBM wanted to get out in front of a whole lot of processor and systems launches that are expected between now and the summer."
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Power 7 OS
by lemur2 on Tue 9th Feb 2010 05:46 UTC
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

The machines reportedly run AIX or Linux.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/188790/ibm_launches_eightcore_power7...

Power7 systems will deliver twice the performance of older Power6 systems, but be four times more energy efficient, Mauri said. The systems will run operating systems including AIX and enterprise Linux offered by Red Hat and Suse.

...

The company also launched four Power7-based servers. IBM Power 780 and Power 770 high-end servers are based on modular designs and come with up to 64 Power7 cores. The IBM Power 755 will support up to 32 Power7 cores.


High-end stuff. If you were to cobble together a small cluster of such machines, I would imagine you would fairly quickly arrive in supercomputer territory without necessarily attracting a massive power bill.

Edited 2010-02-09 05:48 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Power 7 OS
by SReilly on Tue 9th Feb 2010 11:43 in reply to "Power 7 OS"
SReilly Member since:
2006-12-28

High-end stuff. If you were to cobble together a small cluster of such machines, I would imagine you would fairly quickly arrive in supercomputer territory without necessarily attracting a massive power bill.

That is one of the main reasons why POWER7 has been released such a short time after POWER6+. From the wikipedia article:

One feature that IBM and DARPA collaborated on is modifying the addressing and page table hardware to support global shared memory space for POWER7 clusters. This enables research scientists to program a cluster as if it were a single system, without using message passing. From a productivity standpoint, this is essential since most scientists are not conversant with MPI or other exotic parallel programming techniques used in clusters.

IBM basically won $244 million from DARPA to help develop the architecture.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Power 7 OS
by tylerdurden on Tue 9th Feb 2010 22:23 in reply to "RE: Power 7 OS"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

... and unless they win another big DARPA or DoE contract, chances are that POWER7 is the end of the line for IBM's PPC, at least as far as the high performance non-embedded space is concerned.

The cost of developing the architecture and keep up with their fabbing is too much for the relative small market for such systems, without having a larger market to subsidize the development like intel has, for example.

Last I heard, the only reason why IBM is still in the HW business is due to the services revenue it generates, once the bean counters in IBM decide the investment is not worth the return they'll ax a lot of the cool tech that was applied from the PPC into the Z,P,I-series...and the associated ZOS, AIX and OS400 software stacks.

Reply Parent Score: 1