Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 9th Feb 2010 19:06 UTC, submitted by diegocg
KDE And there we are, the KDE team has released KDE Software Compilation 4.4, formerly known as, well, KDE. Major new features include social networking and online collaboration integration, the new netbook interface, the KAuth authentication framework, and a lot more.
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nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26


All mainstream hardware is supported by Linux and other related FOSS projects -- often with drivers officially provided by hardware manufacturers.

Lexmark printers are mainstream, are they supported? How about the iphone?


These days, you can get pretty much any PC off the shelf and a modern Linux distro works on it. In the worst case one has to download the drivers manually.

Out of curiosity I was wondering if anyone has had any success with Linux on a laptop I might buy. Hmm what do you know, wireless problems:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1364651

Let's try another laptop I was looking at, the Toshiba Satellite M505D-S497. Hmm look at this poor ACPI support:
http://laptopforums.toshiba.com/t5/Open-Topic/Linux/td-p/58737;jses...

So the worst case it is unsupported and the second worst case is that you have to download and compile the drivers, right? You think that is acceptable in 2010?


Sure, there is hardware that doesn't work with Linux, but you can just as well find hardware that doesn't work with Windows (usually slightly older hardware for which the manufacturer refuses to support newer Windows versions).

Every printer at best buy will work with Windows. Every laptop will work with Windows. The same can't be said for Linux so I find your comparison to be rather disingenuous.

Linux has better support than it used to but it isn't comparable to Windows, especially for new hardware. Describing the situation as comparable since Linux has support for legacy hardware presents a dishonest view for users. No one cares that Linux can support 16 bit sound cards. They'd rather have iphone/ipod support.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" All mainstream hardware is supported by Linux and other related FOSS projects -- often with drivers officially provided by hardware manufacturers.
Lexmark printers are mainstream, are they supported? How about the iphone?
These days, you can get pretty much any PC off the shelf and a modern Linux distro works on it. In the worst case one has to download the drivers manually.
Out of curiosity I was wondering if anyone has had any success with Linux on a laptop I might buy. Hmm what do you know, wireless problems: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1364651 Let's try another laptop I was looking at, the Toshiba Satellite M505D-S497. Hmm look at this poor ACPI support: http://laptopforums.toshiba.com/t5/Open-Topic/Linux/td-p/58737;jses... So the worst case it is unsupported and the second worst case is that you have to download and compile the drivers, right? You think that is acceptable in 2010?
Sure, there is hardware that doesn't work with Linux, but you can just as well find hardware that doesn't work with Windows (usually slightly older hardware for which the manufacturer refuses to support newer Windows versions).
Every printer at best buy will work with Windows. Every laptop will work with Windows. The same can't be said for Linux so I find your comparison to be rather disingenuous. Linux has better support than it used to but it isn't comparable to Windows, especially for new hardware. Describing the situation as comparable since Linux has support for legacy hardware presents a dishonest view for users. No one cares that Linux can support 16 bit sound cards. They'd rather have iphone/ipod support.
"

You have it slightly the wrong way around. It is a case of "Certain hardware does not support xyz OS", rather than "xyz OS does not support certain hardware".

For example, certain older hardware, typically anything that was out of production by the time that Vista was released, supports only Windows XP and Linux. This is true of a substantial percentage of printers still in use ... there is a driver CD for that printer for Windows XP and earlier, and Linux has a driver, but the printer does not support Vista or Windows 7.

As far as Lexmark printers goes, here is the state of play:

http://www.openprinting.org/printer_list.cgi?make=Lexmark

In general Lexmark doesn't have particularly good support for Linux, so I would buy one. The ink is hellishly expensive anyway.

Mind you, most of those Lexmark printers listed above wouldn't have a driver for Vista or Windows 7 either, so in general the Lexmark support for current Windows is even worse.

Reply Parent Score: 3

boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

For example, certain older hardware, typically anything that was out of production by the time that Vista was released, supports only Windows XP and Linux. This is true of a substantial percentage of printers still in use ... there is a driver CD for that printer for Windows XP and earlier, and Linux has a driver, but the printer does not support Vista or Windows 7.


Indeed. I did an internship with Floyd County as a tech back when I was an undergrad, around the time Vista launched. We got in a whole bunch of new machines running Vista, and it was my job to configure and deploy them. The biggest problem we had was printer drivers: for a lot of our very old (parallel-port) printers, there was just no way to get them working with Vista. IIRC, we had to downgrade several machines to XP, basically so they'd work with the printers we had. I think we also held back several machines for the assayer's office, also because of compatability issues with old hardware and software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Lexmark printers are mainstream, are they supported? How about the iphone?


Are you just incapable to use Google or is this a lame attempt at trolling?
According to http://www.openprinting.org/printer_list.cgi?make=Lexmark the majority of Lexmark printers work on Linux and iPhones work with Linux, too, according to http://marcansoft.com/blog/2009/10/iphone-syncing-on-linux/

OTOH iPhones don't really seem to work at all on 64bit Windows:
http://tech.blorge.com/Structure:%20/2007/06/30/iphone-not-comp...
http://secunia.com/community/forum/thread/show/3358/windows_7_64_bi...

If you are picking hardware for your lame "proofs" that Linux is bad and Windows is great, pick hardware that works with Windows.

Out of curiosity I was wondering if anyone has had any success with Linux on a laptop I might buy. Hmm what do you know, wireless problems:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1364651

According to http://mgsimon.de/2010/01/17/linux-notebook-p50ij-von-asus-im-test/ and http://ixsoft.de/cgi-bin/web_store.cgi?ref=Products/de/ASSO008LHW-4... (German) that notebook can be bought with Linux preinstalled.

Let's try another laptop I was looking at, the Toshiba Satellite M505D-S497. Hmm look at this poor ACPI support:
http://laptopforums.toshiba.com/t5/Open-Topic/Linux/td-p/58737;jses...

Seriously? You are complaining that a manufacturer that produces notebooks that don't even work properly with Windows has problems with Linux? To quote from the very same page:
"Also I will like to know how can I get the 3G Wan connection working under windows, (...) it does not connect or even get any cell phone signal from my GSM provider, under windows 7."
Looks more like Toshiba notebooks ship with broken hardware that doesn't work in whatever OS.


So the worst case it is unsupported and the second worst case is that you have to download and compile the drivers, right?

Bullsh*t. Nobody compiles drivers these days. Why should anyone? FOSS drivers are shipped with the distributions -- just get a recent one.
Proprietary drivers may require to be downloaded separately, but they are proprietary... that means closed source. You can't compile a closed source driver yourself. :-p

Your attempts at trolling are so lame, it's very funny.

Every printer at best buy will work with Windows.

For how long? Will there be Windows 8 drivers?

Every laptop will work with Windows. The same can't be said for Linux so I find your comparison to be rather disingenuous.

Of course they'll work with Linux.
Or do you see any laptop at Best Buy that does not have a chipset by Intel, AMD/ATI, or NVidia these days?
Those three companies all develop FOSS chipset drivers directly in the Linux kernel repository. AMD/ATI and Nvidia additionally provide closed-source GPU drivers. AMD/ATI also has very well working FOSS drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 5

boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

I've got an semi-old (two years) Acer lap-top, Z96J (I think) dual-booting Windows 7 and Fedora 12. Guess what? Neither the built-in USB web-cam nor the sound card work in Windows 7. Turns out, so far as I can determine, there's just no driver for that hardware for Win7, period, ever. And I had to manually download the driver for the Ati Radion x1800m graphics card. Manual driver installs, and hardware without drivers, period. Do you think that's acceptable in 2010?

By the way, everything was supported out-of-the-box in Fedora, even the web-cam(!).

My point here isn't that "Windows has worse hardware support in Linux." My point is, it's a mixed bag whatever you use: for any OS on any real-world hardware, especially usually-more-exotic laptops, some things just aren't going to work well, and some things won't work at all. It's true on Linux and it's true on Windows. Deal with it.

(Oh, another gripe is that, in order to turn off tap-to-click in Win7, I had to install the third-party Synaptics driver: the basic Win7 touchpad driver didn't have an option to disable tap-to-click, that I could find. So, that's more manual work to resolve hardware driver issues. And now I have the synaptics tray agent running all the damned time -- yes, I know I could disable it, but to do that, I'd have to run MSCONFIG and poke at system internals for two minutes, and that's just so... not 2010. ;) )

Reply Parent Score: 4

Eruaran Member since:
2009-01-25

How about you talk to Lexmark and Apple, or Toshiba before you lay blame with GNU/Linux. Kernel developers and distributions bend over backwards to make sure that Linux supports more hardware "out of the box" than any other operating system. What do you think is "acceptable in 2010"? As if this community does not already do an awful lot to support your hardware. It's free software, and it owes you nothing. Go talk to Apple and friends if you want to find somebody to blame. If you want to talk about honesty, you can start with a clean install of Windows and find out for yourself what drivers you'll need to download after installing before you start slagging off about Linux hardware support.

Reply Parent Score: 2