Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 15th Feb 2010 15:47 UTC
Windows So, after much, much speculation and many, many rumours, Microsoft finally took the wraps off Windows Phone 7 Series, its newest mobile operating system. Hold on to your hats, because uncharacteristically for the Redmond giant, they've rebuilt everything from the ground up - this system has little to no connection to the Windows Mobile of yore. I don't say this lightly - but dear lord, Windows Phone 7 Series is full of win. Update: Hands-on video from Engadget inside. Update II: There is no sync application. It's all done over-the-air, to the internet. Only videos and music are synced via the Zune software. Update III: Since I didn't mention it clearly, here it goes: Windows Phone 7 Series is a clean break. There is no backwards compatibility at all. Update IV: Channel9 has a 22-minute in-depth demonstration of Windows Phone 7 Series.
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Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:18 UTC
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

Microsoft is going to be pretty strict about how the devices may look. Screen resolution, aspect ratio, CPU speed, memory, you name it; it's all mandated by Microsoft. Even the button configuration: Start, back, search. That's it. No deviations. Speaking of deviations - no more custom UIs, Microsoft doesn't allow them.


I'm wondering if MS are shooting themselves in the foot by having such a strict control over hardware when Android is fast gaining popularity.

After all, one of Windows Mobile's selling features was customization and platform range.

I appreciate that Apple have had a great deal of success over their closed design, but not every handset has to be an "iPhone killer" to compete with the iPhone.
And quite frankly, Microsoft stand a better chance against Google's Android (as much as I personally love the platform) than they do against Apple's iPhone.

So with this in mind, I'd be very interested to see how hardware designers court with Windows Phone and if Android picks up any market share from manufacturers wanting to release custom alternatives.

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by Laurence
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:21 in reply to "Comment by Laurence"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Android is nice and all, but I simply don't understand Google's strategy. Every phone has to be updated by manufacturers, there are lots of different UIs already, different versions all existing side-by-side, which makes it very hard for developers to target the best of the best.

Blimey, that sounds a whole lot like Windows Mobile up until today!

I'll have to wait for the nitty gritty about WP7S (SDK, multitasking, etc.), but so far, it's looking pretty damn good. Tighter control is the way to go hardware-wise, because it ensures a single, non-moving target for developers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

v RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by Francis Kuntz on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:28 in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by TBPrince on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:30 in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

True.

But actually, real problem with Windows Mobile pre-7 was the hell about resolution. Basically Microsoft was doing too much, by supporting too many resolutions to allow phone makers to do what they wanted regarding size, buttons placements and so on. It was great for makers which could use the same codebase for many different phones but no good for developers which had to support too many resolutions and also cope with landscape/portrait differences.

I'm waiting to know more about internal details too. Rumors weren't that pleasing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by kragil on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:37 in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Not true, if you read blogs from Android devs than it is clear that the wide variety of devices, screen sizes and OS versions is not that big a deal. Sure it hinders mobilbe gaming. But for other apps it really does not matter that much.

Android has really good foundations and enough abstraction to deal with all this stuff. It may be a little more work to write a good Android app, but nobody needs the 150k fart and flashlight apps in the Appstore anyways. I for one need more FOSS apps. Those will get adapted to all devices quicker than anything.

That said, vendors like Samsung that just ship the Galaxy with Android 1.5 and never update have to die. Google should make sure somehow that users get at least a few minor updates.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: This is primarly a Iphone competitor
by kragil on Mon 15th Feb 2010 16:29 in reply to "Comment by Laurence"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

I don't think this is more targeted towards Android than the Iphone.
Android is less than free, you can get money from Google if you put Android on your handset. MS will want to see money for WP7, so the devices will be expensive and probably fall in the Iphone price range.

Android devices will be way cheaper or have way better hardware specs.

And make no mistake, Android will evolve. Android is modular. Putting a new OpenGL-UI ontop of Android would be possible for this holiday season.

And don't forget all the free stuff you get with your Android phone (Goggles, Turn-by-turn navi, Google Voice etc)

Android is more than capable to deal with new competitors (be it Bada or WP7)

Edited 2010-02-15 16:30 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

I don't think this is more targeted towards Android than the Iphone.

That was my point.
I think Microsoft would be smarter refining their platform than shift their focus.


Android is less than free, you can get money from Google if you put Android on your handset.

That's interesting to know.
Wasn't aware of Google's pricing strategy.


And make no mistake, Android will evolve. Android is modular. Putting a new OpenGL-UI ontop of Android would be possible for this holiday season.

And don't forget all the free stuff you get with your Android phone (Goggles, Turn-by-turn navi, Google Voice etc)

Android is more than capable to deal with new competitors (be it Bada or WP7)

I'm well aware of all this.
I'm by no means stating that WM7 is better than Android or that Google couldn't compete in this market.

I just think Android is an easier target than the iPhone and, though the iPhone has a bigger market share, Android has more room for growth due to it's open nature.

So, to me, it seems more logical to attack the biggest potential market rather than the one that seems the most popular now but also the most competitive.

However, it's not my decision and, for all I currently know, MS might be making the right decision.
Either way, I'll be keeping a close eye on the market to see how things pan out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


Android is more than capable to deal with new competitors (be it Bada or WP7)

Android doesn't have a good multimedia library. The game selection is rather lacking as well. I'd be willing to pay quite a bit extra for a mobile 7 phone just to have access to xbox live. Android is good for people who just want a phone and mini-browser but it can't compete when it comes to the itunes store.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Laurence
by Flatland_Spider on Tue 16th Feb 2010 20:19 in reply to "Comment by Laurence"
Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

I'm wondering if MS are shooting themselves in the foot by having such a strict control over hardware when Android is fast gaining popularity.


I think the tight control is a good move. In the past it was a pain to get updates, and now it should be easier with a central contact point. This should also help with time to market. The handset makers won't have to tweak the OS as much, and they can concentrate on hardware innovations. Also, remember manufactures love installing crapware. Hopefully this policy will cut down on that.

I'll support anything that makes phones closer to the PC model.

Reply Parent Score: 1