Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 17th Feb 2010 12:29 UTC
Editorial Recently, a story about people mistaking a news story for the Facebook login page has received considerable media attention. It's currently being seen by many as justification for the recent trend in locking people out of their computers for their own protection - but anyone with even basic mathematical skills and a calculator should come to the conclusion that this story has been blown way out of proportion.
Thread beginning with comment 409776
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Let me get this straight
by Fettarme H-Milch on Wed 17th Feb 2010 14:04 UTC
Fettarme H-Milch
Member since:
2010-02-16

These days common people are more used to a command line interface (= entering commands into Google) than a point and click GUI (= click on the bookmark)???

So the next time I install an operating system on someone's PC, I can just take the geekiest Linux distro that boots directly into bash and tell them "just google the app name"??

Reply Score: 4

RE: Let me get this straight
by libray on Wed 17th Feb 2010 15:55 in reply to "Let me get this straight"
libray Member since:
2005-08-27

I don't think this can be summed up into people who typed www.google.com and then entered "facebook login"

Browsers also made things easier for users, thus adding to this problem. Years ago, if you type anything into an address bar besides a valid URL, you were shown an error message. When people learned that you can't search that way, we taught them how to use bookmarks and if they need to search use the search bookmark.

Now, the majority of browsers send those words to its default search engine and with some, you can either type into the address bar or an additional search bar without knowing what you are doing and still get to where you want to go.

Reply Parent Score: 2

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

Browsers also made things easier for users, thus adding to this problem. Years ago, if you type anything into an address bar besides a valid URL, you were shown an error message. When people learned that you can't search that way, we taught them how to use bookmarks and if they need to search use the search bookmark.

Now, the majority of browsers send those words to its default search engine and with some, you can either type into the address bar or an additional search bar without knowing what you are doing and still get to where you want to go.


It also doesn't help that, thanks to ICANN's incompetence, domain names are becoming less and less useful for finding specific websites. I fully expect that we'll reach a point when domain squatters/stockpilers will account for the majority of domain name registrations (if that isn't already the case).

So far, the only "solution" from ICANN has been the addition of new TLDs (rather than enforcing the rules for existing TLDs). That merely guarantees that it will be easier to just use Google - "was that osnews.info, or osnews.mobi, or osnews.us? Ah screw this, I'll just google it."

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Let me get this straight
by earksiinni on Wed 17th Feb 2010 17:34 in reply to "Let me get this straight"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

That's actually a very interesting point...great observation!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Let me get this straight
by Laurence on Wed 17th Feb 2010 18:23 in reply to "Let me get this straight"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

These days common people are more used to a command line interface (= entering commands into Google) than a point and click GUI (= click on the bookmark)???

So the next time I install an operating system on someone's PC, I can just take the geekiest Linux distro that boots directly into bash and tell them "just google the app name"??


I'm a little disappointed with teh lack of attention your comment has received as I think you've nailed a home truth there.

Command line interfaces are easier to use because you describe what you're trying to do (like how you describe what you want to search for in Google).
GUIs, despite all the hype, demand users visualize things exactly as the GUI was designed - and not everybody does.

So logically, the next stage of usability isn't multi-touch, but "spoken-line interface" ( (C) 2010 by me ;) ) whereby the users describe the functions vocally and the GUI updates accordingly (I guess a bit like on Star Trek)

With advances in speech recognition, this idea is might already be practical....

Reply Parent Score: 3

AnythingButVista Member since:
2008-08-27

These days common people are more used to a command line interface (= entering commands into Google) than a point and click GUI (= click on the bookmark)??? So the next time I install an operating system on someone's PC, I can just take the geekiest Linux distro that boots directly into bash and tell them "just google the app name"??

This post is brilliant!

Reply Parent Score: 1