Linked by David Adams on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 08:37 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless While it's been a low-level grumbling for years, the issue of Flash on mobile devices (and particularly the iPhone/Touch/iPad ecosystem) has reached fever pitch over the past few weeks, with Steve Jobs as self-appointed Flash basher-in-Chief. The OSNews crowd, that is, dyed-in-the-wool technologists have, by and large, not been big fans of Flash, with its spotty availability and performance on alternative platforms, resource hogging, and instability. And though it's quite useful for web video and other specialized interfaces, it drives the tech savvy crazy when it's used for utterly superfluous multimedia bling. So we've had a lively discussion of the pros and cons of Flash, and whether device users should be free to make their own decision about whether it's worthy to install on their iPads. But we're leaving out an important detail. As Daniel Eran Dilger, a Flash developer, points out, almost all the important existing Flash infrastructure won't work anyway. Update: A worthwhile rebuttal to this point of view.
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RE: Comment by Kroc
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 12:46 UTC in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

WHAT FREAKIN’ GIVES?


What gives is that if Apple included Flash on the iPhone, and if Jobs would've ragged on HTML5, this article would tell us how HTML5 is not good for the user experience.

That's what "freakin' gives".

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 12:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Yes, but then that’s a different article to this one. Let’s focus on reality.

He didn’t claim to be an HTML5 developer. HTML5 is mentioned just once:

Fortunately, those unique Flash applications are 1) in the minority, 2) may be largely duplicable with HTML5 canvas, 3) ported to iPad using Adobe’s Packager for iPhone, or 4) rewritten from the ground up as native apps. The most common uses of Flash on the web—video, ads, and relatively simple menus—can be done in JavaScript and H.264 video.


I don’t see an ounce of bias there. Opinion, maybe, but that’s not unexpected.

Honestly, I’ve written far worse. I don’t admit to being unbiased. I code HTML5, HTML5 is the future in my opinion and one day Flash may be irrelevant and unnecessary as RealPlayer is now.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 13:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

What I meant was that RD will adapt its opinions, arguments, and everything else to bring it in line with Apple's. If Apple were to add Flash to the iPhone tomorrow, and remove all HTML5 stuff from Safari, we'd see an article the day after tomorrow by the exact same writer, explaining in great detail why the move is a good one, and why Apple is right.

That's why RD is simply not a source I link to in any way. Of course, others are free to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 13:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Kroc"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

What an idiot! That quote is from one of the comments! *headdesk* Apologies people. HTML5 wasn’t mentioned at all in the article.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by fatjoe on Mon 22nd Feb 2010 15:07 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
fatjoe Member since:
2010-01-12

Thom, that was my thoughts exactly!


Remember way back when iPhone did not have a SDK and relied on web content? When the same Apple apologists tried to convince everyone that the web was the future and a native programs were the root of all evil?

Anyone else remembers those days?

Reply Parent Score: 3