Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 00:22 UTC, submitted by PLan
GNU, GPL, Open Source "With your purchase of On2, you now own both the world's largest video site (YouTube) and all the patents behind a new high performance video codec - VP8. Just think what you can achieve by releasing the VP8 codec under an irrevocable royalty-free license and pushing it out to users on YouTube? You can end the web's dependence on patent-encumbered video formats and proprietary software (Flash)."
Thread beginning with comment 410452
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: How good is VP8?
by rhy7s on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 02:44 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: How good is VP8?"
rhy7s
Member since:
2008-08-04

It's jerky with high CPU usage in Firefox for me as well but the downloaded file plays fine in MPC so the Firefox decoder may be to blame.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: How good is VP8?
by graigsmith on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 12:35 in reply to "RE[3]: How good is VP8?"
graigsmith Member since:
2006-04-05

why should we have a codec that demands high cpu usage, how's it gonna work on portable devices. people do not want theora. people want it to work on their smart phones.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: How good is VP8?
by lemur2 on Tue 23rd Feb 2010 12:52 in reply to "RE[4]: How good is VP8?"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

why should we have a codec that demands high cpu usage, how's it gonna work on portable devices. people do not want theora. people want it to work on their smart phones.


(1) Theora is less CPU intensive than h264. It demands less calculation for the same quality and bitrate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theora#Playback_performance
However since decoding Theora is less CPU intensive than decoding H.264, hardware acceleration may not be necessary in all devices.


(2) Even if it were actually true, I'd personally still much rather a codec that did demand more cpu over one that demands any royalty fees and restricts user choice of web access platform.

(3) A hardware decoder for Theora is in development. (See link above).
There is an open source VHDL code base for a hardware Theora decoder in development.

Apparently it is called leon3.
http://svn.xiph.org/trunk/theora-fpga/

This design will answer any doubts over use of Theora on smart phones. However, the more general observation would be that if a video is small enough to fit on a smart phone screen, then Theora is undemanding enough so as to not require such hardware assistance, even on an underpowered smart phone.

(4) On existing video graphics cards, many GPUs can be programmed for general purpose computing.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPGPU

One of the things that one could use GPGPU for is ... implementing a GPU hardware accelerated Theora decoder. Hence many graphics cards already have all the required support for hardware-acceleration of Theora video.

The following are some of the areas where GPUs have been used for general purpose computing:
...
# Video Processing

* Hardware accelerated video decoding and post-processing
o Motion compensation (mo comp)
o Inverse discrete cosine transform (iDCT)
o Variable-length decoding (VLD)
o Inverse quantization (IQ)
o In-loop deblocking
o Bitstream processing (CAVLC/CABAC) using special purpose hardware for this task because this is a serial task not suitable for regular GPGPU computation
o Deinterlacing
+ Spatial-temporal de-interlacing
o Noise reduction
o Edge enhancement
o Color correction
* Hardware accelerated video encoding and pre-processing


Edited 2010-02-23 13:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3