Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Mar 2010 20:43 UTC, submitted by kragil
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Canonical has unveiled a complete branding overhaul, redesigning everything from the Ubuntu website to its logos and marketing material. However, what interests me more are the new Gtk+ themes, and even then, I'm not interested in the colour choices and the like. No - what stood out to me right away was not the theme itself - but the placement of the titlebar widgets.
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RE: KUbuntu?
by KAMiKAZOW on Wed 3rd Mar 2010 23:45 UTC in reply to "KUbuntu?"
KAMiKAZOW
Member since:
2005-07-06

KDE has this initiative to share a common KDE identity among various distros and many distributors followed it by at most tweaking KDE's Oxygen/Air themes (openSUSE has a green Air wallpaper as opposed to blue, for example).

Yeah, Kubuntu doesn't even tweak themes, but in this case Canonical's laziness may even work to KDE's advantage. ;-)

Too bad that Canonical currently doesn't really "get it" (even though -- in all fairness -- Kubuntu 10.04 seems to be a massive improvement over previous releases). I mailed with Aurlien who works for Canonical on KDE software and his job there is to take ideas from the Desktop Experience team and implement them in KDE SC. So far those ideas only cover aspects that are foremost developed for GNOME. In advantage of KDE, Canonical's idea to overhaul GNOME's systray makes use of KDE's protocol that is implemented there since SC 4.3 and Aurlien's work is to port further KDE apps to it.
Sadly, at least for now Canonical seems to have no intentions to do KDE-specific usability work as they do for GNOME.

Maybe Canonical will strengthen the KDE/Qt side of things once MeeGo (Qt-based successor to Moblin) is released. As with Ubuntu's current "Moblin Edition" there surely will be a "MeeGo Edition" and naturally KDE apps will fit in there better than GTK apps.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: KUbuntu?
by KenP on Thu 4th Mar 2010 00:32 in reply to "RE: KUbuntu?"
KenP Member since:
2009-07-28

This is sad, really. We have had over 10 iterations of Ubuntu and the dawn of Linux on the general desktop is nowhere in sight.

Consider for a moment if Ubuntu had started off with KDE as the default desktop! For the single reason that its default layout kind-of looks like Windows, along with Canonical's excellent customisation, we would have had many more converts over to Linux than now where we are blatantly copying Apple, right from the icons in the panel to, now, window buttons on the left!!

With each version, Kubuntu is more or less left to fend on its own. The funny part is that of all the derivatives and alternatives of Ubunutu, the word "kubuntu" happens to be an actual word! Others are all mashes of the word ubuntu.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: KUbuntu?
by KAMiKAZOW on Thu 4th Mar 2010 00:45 in reply to "RE[2]: KUbuntu?"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Consider for a moment if Ubuntu had started off with KDE as the default desktop! For the single reason that its default layout kind-of looks like Windows

Oh common, that's (pardon my straight-forward language) the stupidest reason I've ever heard. KDE 1-3 were heavily inspired by Windows (along with many many inspirations from CDE which is often forgotten), but since 4 the biggest layout similarity with Windows is that by default the task bar is at the bottom of the screen.

If Canonical wanted, they could've easily created a "Windows-like" taskbar in GNOME. There isn't even coding required -- that's part of GNOME's default customization possibilities! SUSE for example does this (along with a new start menu, SLAB, that is coded by SUSE, but can also be installed on any other distro).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: KUbuntu?
by SEJeff on Mon 8th Mar 2010 03:16 in reply to "RE[2]: KUbuntu?"
SEJeff Member since:
2005-11-05

Looks don't convert users, apps do. Where is TurboTax for a serious AutoCAD equivalent for Linux? How about a professional video editor like After Effects? The most promising open source video editor is PiTiVi, and even that is quite a ways off.

Linux slowly moves into niches and then dominates them. It certainly has not slowed down so the future holds bright prospects.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: KUbuntu?
by Soulbender on Thu 4th Mar 2010 07:15 in reply to "RE: KUbuntu?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Yeah, Kubuntu doesn't even tweak themes


Neither does opensuse very much(really only small changes to the plasma theme) and I'm sure happy they don't have anything as awful as Mandriva's Ia Ora. Oxygen kicks ass. Also, Kubuntu has Konqueror as the default browser. How come none of the "better" KDE distros do?
Kubuntu is probably one of the purest KDE distros really.

Too bad that Canonical currently doesn't really "get it" (even though -- in all fairness -- Kubuntu 10.04 seems to be a massive improvement over previous releases).


I still don't get what's supposedly so incredibly bad about the current Kubuntu compared to other distros.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: KUbuntu?
by jokkel on Thu 4th Mar 2010 07:39 in reply to "RE[2]: KUbuntu?"
jokkel Member since:
2008-07-07

Konqueror is almost unusable as a web browser nowadays.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: KUbuntu?
by KAMiKAZOW on Thu 4th Mar 2010 14:35 in reply to "RE[2]: KUbuntu?"
KAMiKAZOW Member since:
2005-07-06

Neither does opensuse very much(really only small changes to the plasma theme)

That's what I said.

Kubuntu has Konqueror as the default browser. How come none of the "better" KDE distros do?

Because they ship something else, eg. Rekonq (Chakra) or SUSE's KDE port of Firefox.
There was even a discussion about replacing Konqueror with Rekonq on KDE's core development mailing list, but Rekonq's main developer prefers the Extragear module.

I still don't get what's supposedly so incredibly bad about the current Kubuntu compared to other distros.

Quotes from Kubuntu's "Project Timelord" announcement:

"There is a general lack of Quality Assurance on uploads to both development releases and on backports of KDE packages to stable releases. File overwrite errors are too common in both cases. As a potential issue, we also have a collection of patches for most of our core KDE patches. These patches may or may not be of good quality, depending on the patch.
Another issue that seems to pop up is that some KDE modules are not compiled with all the functionality they are capable of. (...) These tend to be forgotten about too easily.

(...)

[Kubuntu-specific] applications lack polish (...) and usually are not integrated well at all with the surrounding system (...), causing needless clutter."

Reply Parent Score: 2