Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 9th Mar 2010 22:55 UTC
Legal In response to Apple's lawsuit against HTC, Jonathan Schwartz, former CEO of Sun Microsystems, has written a very intriguing blog post providing an insight into how major companies like Apple and Microsoft treat patents. He recounts two occasions on which Apple and Microsoft threatened to sue Sun - and how Sun retorted.
Thread beginning with comment 413192
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
red_devel
Member since:
2006-03-30

WOW. Comments like this amaze me, and its amazing to see them modded up so high. Now don't get me wrong: I despise software patents. I think you're right they're used for greed and I think its deplorable and needs to change. And I have major major problems with Free Trade, though probably not for the same reasons as you. (I'm more concerned about the effect free trade has on poorer nations of the world, but thats a whole 'nother can of worms we're not going to open here.) But that said....

Almost makes me cheer as I see America collapsing. And I'm a US citizen!


Really??? And...

It's ironic that programmers in places like China and Cuba have less to fear than those in the USA (the "bastion of freedom").


Honestly?????? More freedom. In CHINA? Seriously? Sorry, you don't know what your saying. Unless you mean the freedom to only have one child and the freedom to have a forced abortion if you do get pregnant a second time. Or the freedom to be arrested and jailed indefinitely for no reason, with no due process, and no recourse, just because you're suspected to be anti-government. Ironically, if these anti-USA comments you posted here were anti-PRC comments and you were a Chinese citizen, you'd probably have someone knocking on your door about them.

Somewhere along the line people got the idea that a patriot was a person who blindly supported his country no matter what it does and decided that made patriot a bad word. Actually, a true patriot will criticize the faults in his country because he loves it enough to want it to be better. You're right: patent law is broken, and we need to fix it, not try to spread it around the world. But your comments, my friend, are not constructive criticism aimed at effecting change. Thats blind rage and hate. Next will you post a 6 page manifesto and fly your Pieper into an IRS building?

You live in the most affluent country in the world. I have been to some of the poorest places in the world, and believe me, they have bigger things to worry about than software patents. If thats your biggest bone to pick, count your blessings. And, unlike in China or Cuba, if you don't like it here you are free to leave. I hear Greece is nice this time of year.

Reply Parent Score: 2

crazy handsets Member since:
2010-03-11

Well, your comments amaze me too.

Unless you mean the freedom to only have one child and the freedom to have a forced abortion if you do get pregnant a second time.

Though you are not a Chinese, you should know how many people it has.As a Chinese, I adimit China is not so affluent as USA (of course, we don't have so much government loan from other countries, either). You know why? Because we have such a large population. In the past, many poor families had five or more babies and they became even poorer. Many families didn't have enough food to foster their children, let alone education. When We tried to limit our numbers, you said it was human rights abuse. Different countries have different circumstances and produce different policies. Don't just stay in your "affluent" country and criticize those development countries for no human-rights or freedom, please!

In my opinion, patent right is necessary to protect the rights and interests of the research personnel. But it can't be used as a tool for seeking excessive profits. Otherwise, piracies will wreak havoc.
And neither the issue between Apple and Sun nor Microsoft and Sun is nothing to do with our consumers. Any how, it's nothing but a redistribution of the cake.

Reply Parent Score: 3